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24 July, 2021 06:31:31 PM
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Ensure effective class assessment

In the classroom while teaching and learning feedback has been an inseparable part, it is unfortunate that effective feedback practices in the class are hardly found
Alaul Alam
Ensure effective class assessment

Appropriate instruction is the key to ensuring quality education. Such an instruction reinforces learners and maximizes the outcome in education. But the question is can we ensure quality education without quality teaching? The answer would be completely negative as we cannot. Similarly, we cannot sustain effective teaching if it is devoid of feedback practices. According to Professor John Hattie, feedback is the simplest prescription for improving education and without which learning is just a series of random experiences.
In the classroom while teaching and learning feedback has been an inseparable part, but it is unfortunate that effective feedback practices in the class are hardly found. It seems that it is not the headache of the teachers whether students understand the class, rather they are found habituated to forcing students stick to memorization. In these days the outcome of education is misjudged as getting GPA 5 has been much demanding than what is acquired at heart. So, ultimately in the pedagogical practices feedback seems to be less important which takes the situation into despondency.
It is true that we cannot deny the challenges of ensuring feedback from the learners at different education levels. At every education level whether it is primary, secondary or tertiary the class size is usually large. In most cases it is tough for a teacher to provide the learners individual feedback, especially on class activities.
The causes are many; so feedback practices are disrupted in the class. Limited class hour may be one of the main causes in this regard. Again, in the teacher-centric class students hardly see the class participatory and interactive. Besides, teachers and students’ attitudes towards giving and receiving feedback matter the most. In many cases, we notice that teachers underline some sections of students’ writing with red colour without giving any explanations that hardly work to correct their students. Obviously, there may be many learners who do not ask for any explanation from their teachers or peers lest they might lose face before the class.
Different studies reveal that teachers pay less importance on assessing students with providing effective feedback, rather they like to assess their students giving grades. With this students have a little scope to correct them. Many experts suggest that besides providing grades teachers should give their students feedback on their works. Such practices will ultimately encourage them and reduce their mistakes.
Again sometimes we notice that teachers are very quick to respond the learners. It can be terrible for the learners to go through the feedback when teachers only beat about the bush with no specific guidelines for them. Besides, feedback can hardly pose any positive impact when teachers are too slow to provide their students feedback. There may be many evidences that teachers take a long time to assess any written work of the students. In this point, despite they provide feedback on their works, students hardly ponder over them.
On top of that, teaching and learning through English medium instruction has caused another blow in case of ensuring feedback practices. At tertiary level of education English medium instruction has been mandatory in the class. But it is obvious that still the language proficiency of our teachers and learners in most cases is not satisfactory. It seems challenging for teachers to provide effective feedback in such classes if they have poor command over English. Not only that, students with poor language skills hardly get involved in class activities let alone asking any explanation from their teachers and peers.
Things get tougher for teachers to provide effective feedback in virtual education. It is obvious that our education is undergoing unprecedented days due to the uncertain closures amid the coronavirus pandemic. Virtual education is going on to meet the education catastrophe but how far it works to address the outcome of education is a long debate. It is also worth looking for how far our teachers can ensure feedback for the students in the new normal teaching and learning?
It is tough to give feedback in the physical classroom and certainly tougher in online platform where in many cases, students and teachers struggle to cope with the situation for some unavoidable reasons. Students of schools and colleges hardly have any scopes to ask for any explanation in the pre-recorded remote classes and similarly teachers have no scopes to make the class interactive. Same is for the tertiary level of education. As online class is mostly teacher-centric, students’ involvement is hardly found there. Consequently, feedback practices go disregarded in most cases.
Certainly, teachers are the facilitators in the student-centric class whether it is online or offline. They cannot deny the responsibility of becoming an active part in regard to ensuring feedback from their learners to maximize the outcome of education. In this regard it is very imperative to consider feedback one of the best pedagogical practices to reinforce outcome-based education.
The writer teaches at Prime University. He is also a research scholar at the IBS. Email: [email protected]

 

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Editorial, News & Commercial Offices : Beximco Media Complex, 149-150 Tejgaon I/A, Dhaka-1208, Bangladesh. GPO Box No. 934, Dhaka-1000.

Editor : M. Shamsur Rahman
Published by the Editor on behalf of Independent Publications Limited at Media Printers, 446/H, Tejgaon I/A, Dhaka-1215.
Editorial, News & Commercial Offices : Beximco Media Complex, 149-150 Tejgaon I/A, Dhaka-1208, Bangladesh. GPO Box No. 934, Dhaka-1000.

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