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24 August, 2019 00:00 00 AM / LAST MODIFIED: 24 August, 2019 01:40:28 AM
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Recruiting workers: When failure means loss

TO MAKE SENDING OF WORKERS SMOOTH AND HASSLE-FREE, THE COUNTRY HAS A SEPARATE MINISTRY

It is regrettable that the inter-ministerial committee formed to investigate into allegations of monopoly of 10 recruiting agencies could not submit its report before the relevant High Court bench in time. Malaysia has stopped taking Bangladesh expatriate workers from September this year following allegations that a syndicate was charging high recruitment fees and exploiting migrant workers.

According to a recent media report , the recruitment cost went up to Tk. 400,000 which is much higher than the cost fixed under a G-to-G Plus deal between Bangladesh and Malaysia. Under this deal, over two lakh Bangladeshis already went to Malaysia since early 2017. If there had been no allegations many more Bangladeshis would have gone to Malaysia. Moreover, if the court would have received the report from the probe body, it would have been possible for it to give directions so that Malaysia could have altered its decision of stopping taking workers from Bangladesh.

That is what happens in our country. Bangladesh’s economy largely depends on the remittance sent by its expatriate workers, but here the relevant people in the government do not show seriousness to remove problems facing the workers. To make sending of workers smooth and hassle-free, the country has a separate ministry, the Ministry of Expatriates' Welfare and Overseas Employment.

The question here that arises is that since the recruitment was arranged under a government (G) to government (G) deal with involvement of private recruitment agencies (Plus), it is the government of Bangladesh that should have, all through, monitored that no irregularity or anomaly occured in the recruitment process. But the reality is that allegations not only surfaced on the syndicating of the private agencies, as its logical consequence, the government of Malaysia has decided to stop taking workers from Bangladesh.

The reality is Malaysia is one of the major destinations of Bangladeshi workers and the recent decision of Malaysia is certainly, for Bangladesh, a setback that needed to be overcome as soon as possible. But as the inter-ministerial committee has failed to submit its report, more time will elapse in overcoming the trouble. The concerned authorities must act properly and on time. The nation must not become a victim of incompetence.  

 

 

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Editor : M. Shamsur Rahman

Published by the Editor on behalf of Independent Publications Limited at Media Printers, 446/H, Tejgaon I/A, Dhaka-1215.
Editorial, News & Commercial Offices : Beximco Media Complex, 149-150 Tejgaon I/A, Dhaka-1208, Bangladesh. GPO Box No. 934, Dhaka-1000.

Editor : M. Shamsur Rahman
Published by the Editor on behalf of Independent Publications Limited at Media Printers, 446/H, Tejgaon I/A, Dhaka-1215.
Editorial, News & Commercial Offices : Beximco Media Complex, 149-150 Tejgaon I/A, Dhaka-1208, Bangladesh. GPO Box No. 934, Dhaka-1000.

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