Thursday 2 December 2021 ,
Thursday 2 December 2021 ,
Latest News
17 September, 2017 00:00 00 AM / LAST MODIFIED: 16 September, 2017 09:12:24 PM
Print

200-year-old tree faces the axe

Staff Reporter, Barisal
200-year-old tree faces the axe
Branches of a 200-year-old tree are being cut down at Barisal town to avoid life risk. The photo was taken on Thursday. Independent photo

In a clash between heritage and trappings of modern living, a 200-year-old rain tree planted during the British colonial times is on the verge of being cut down at Barisal town.

According to administrative officials, the tree at the residence of the additional deputy commissioner (general) of Barisal on Rajabahadur Road could fall down any time, posing a threat to public safety.

“The branches of the tree are spread over an electricity distribution line, Ladies Club and a major arterial road at Barisal. As such, they pose a risk to passing vehicles as well as people, especially to school-going children and patients to the nearby SBMCH,” said the ADC (general), Md Zakir Hossain.

“Maintaining proper rules, regulations and procedures, the public works department (PWD) has started cutting the tree to avoid life risk,” he added.

Md Ali Bagha, work assistant of PWD, said a big branch of the tree had fallen on an 11 KV electricity distribution line two days ago, disrupting power supply in the area. “So, we've decided to cut down the tree for public safety,” he added.

Ashraf, one of the labourers engaged in cutting the tree, said it could produce at least 600 cubic feet of timber. The cutting of the 200-year-old tree has triggered dismay among environmentalists and cultural activists.  “The trees were planted during the British period for giving shade. We don’t need to cut such old trees.

There are many other ways to ensure public safety. We should try to save the environment and tradition as well,” said Akkas Hossain, an 86-year-old cultural activist at Barisal.

Hossain told The Independent that the area where the tree is located was developed by British colonial rulers for building residences of high officials like revenue collectors. “The houses are still used by senior officials, although their designations and work have been changed from revenue collectors to district commissioners,” he said.

 

Comments


Copyright © All right reserved.

Editor : M. Shamsur Rahman

Published by the Editor on behalf of Independent Publications Limited at Media Printers, 446/H, Tejgaon I/A, Dhaka-1215.
Editorial, News & Commercial Offices : Beximco Media Complex, 149-150 Tejgaon I/A, Dhaka-1208, Bangladesh. GPO Box No. 934, Dhaka-1000.

Editor : M. Shamsur Rahman
Published by the Editor on behalf of Independent Publications Limited at Media Printers, 446/H, Tejgaon I/A, Dhaka-1215.
Editorial, News & Commercial Offices : Beximco Media Complex, 149-150 Tejgaon I/A, Dhaka-1208, Bangladesh. GPO Box No. 934, Dhaka-1000.

Disclaimer & Privacy Policy
....................................................
About Us
....................................................
Contact Us
....................................................
Advertisement
....................................................
Subscription

Powered by : Frog Hosting