Saturday 19 September 2020 ,
Saturday 19 September 2020 ,
Latest News
29 January, 2020 00:00 00 AM / LAST MODIFIED: 29 January, 2020 08:08:35 PM
Print
Noise attack on board exams

Citizens miffed by loudspeaker use

Mubtasim Fuad, Dhaka

Blaring loudspeakers used for campaigning have become a nuisance for students preparing for their Secondary School Certificate (SSC) exams.  The deafening sound is also creating problems for patients at different hospitals. Other people, especially the elderly and children, are also suffering from this sudden rise in the level of noise pollution. As many as 756 mayor and councillor aspirants are contesting the Dhaka North and South city polls. Each councillor candidate uses, on average, two microphones, while the number of microphones used by the mayoral aspirants could not be ascertained.

The continuous sound blurted out by these loudspeakers is taking a toll on the everyday life of citizens. These loudspeakers blast at high decibels near educational institutions, and religious places, and hospitals. According to the City Corporation (Election Code of Conduct) Rules 2016, not more than one microphone can be used during any election campaign. The use of speakers have been limited from 2pm to 8pm.

But this election code of conduct is being violated daily by every candidate contesting the civic polls.  Processions with loudspeakers are being brought up in different parts of Dhaka

after 8pm. Add to that the blaring horns on motorcycles, screaming over microphones, and playing of slogans and songs—the city becomes a seething cauldron of unbearable sounds. With the SSC exams a little over a week away, students are affected by this noise pollution. It also poses health risks to elders and children who are not accustomed to such loud noise. City dwellers have been enduring songs and slogans played on loudspeakers, fitted on moving vehicles, beyond the permitted hours since the campaign began on January 10.  During a visit to ward no. 45 under Dhaka North City Corporation (DNCC), this correspondent saw a man on a rickshaw campaigning with a mike on Monday evening. Two to three minutes’ walk from there, a stage was set up for a view-exchange meeting at Majarpara in Uttarkhan, where the campaign songs of a councillor candidate were played from a loudspeaker. Supporters of two councillor candidates were campaigning with loudspeakers near a maternity hospital in Azimpur. The two camps are within 100–120 feet of each other.

Uttara Sector-7 resident Akhi Tabassum said that her children were unable to sleep at night due to the loud campaigning. “The SSC exams are coming up. The studies of the examinees are being harmed,” she added.

Morseda Jaman, a resident of Pallabi, said her daughter, could hardly concentrate on her studies thanks to the noise coming out of loudspeakers. “My daughter gets very upset as she has a very short time left to complete her exam preparations. We can do nothing but tolerate the nuisance,” she added.

Asked, a councillor candidate said: “Rickshaw-pullers don’t know the actual time of the day. Therefore, they campaign in the wrong hours sometimes. But I will be careful from now on.” As per the Noise Pollution (Control) Rules 2006, the permissible level of sound in residential areas is 50 decibels at daytime and 40 decibels at night. In industrial areas, it is 75 decibels and 70 decibels during daytime and nighttime, respectively. It is 60 decibels and 50 decibels, respectively, at mixed neighbourhoods.

The rules prohibit the use of loudspeakers and even honking of vehicles within 100 metres of any hospital, educational institution, or office. Construction work within 500 metres of residential areas is also prohibited.

Rights organisation Poribesh Bachao Andolon general secretary Abdus Sobhan said: “Winning candidates will work for the people of Dhaka. But if they continue to create problems for residents even before the election, what can we expect from them after the election?”

“The Environment Conservation Act 1995 outlines the use of microphones during polls, but it has to be in keeping with permission from the commission and the police. There is also an election code of conduct. But the candidates are using loudspeakers even after the permitted time. The number of loudspeakers are also more than what the EC has permitted,” he also said.

“This is troubling students enormously. City residents are also the sufferers,” he added.

Abul Kashem, returning officer of DNCC, said they were trying their best to prevent the use of loudspeakers during campaigning. “We have confiscated several loudspeakers from the candidates and even fined them Tk. 5,000 each. Unfortunately, the candidates are hardly paying any heed to it,” he added.

DSCC returning officer Abdul Baten claimed that they were regularly monitoring the sound pollution and trying their best to prevent the use of loudspeakers during election campaign.

 

 

Comments

Most Viewed
Digital Edition
Archive
SunMonTueWedThuFri Sat
0102030405
06070809101112
13141516171819
20212223242526
27282930

Copyright © All right reserved.

Editor : M. Shamsur Rahman

Published by the Editor on behalf of Independent Publications Limited at Media Printers, 446/H, Tejgaon I/A, Dhaka-1215.
Editorial, News & Commercial Offices : Beximco Media Complex, 149-150 Tejgaon I/A, Dhaka-1208, Bangladesh. GPO Box No. 934, Dhaka-1000.

Editor : M. Shamsur Rahman
Published by the Editor on behalf of Independent Publications Limited at Media Printers, 446/H, Tejgaon I/A, Dhaka-1215.
Editorial, News & Commercial Offices : Beximco Media Complex, 149-150 Tejgaon I/A, Dhaka-1208, Bangladesh. GPO Box No. 934, Dhaka-1000.

Disclaimer & Privacy Policy
....................................................
About Us
....................................................
Contact Us
....................................................
Advertisement
....................................................
Subscription

Powered by : Frog Hosting