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25 January, 2020 00:00 00 AM
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Disappearance of water lilies from waterbodies

Our Correspondent, Jhenidah
Disappearance of water lilies from waterbodies
This photo shows water lilies bloom in a Jhenidah waterbody. INDEPENDENT PHOTO

The national flower, water lily, is disappearing fast from 7,500 hectares of waterbodies in Jhenidah. Lack of patronage, commercial fish farming in waterbodies, haphazard use of chemical fertilisers and pesticides, and reduction of water in the waterbodies have been blamed for the decline of this charming flower.

During a visit to the bordering Moheshpur upazila, this correspondent talked to a number of people at Jagusa, Jadabpur, and a few other villages. The villagers said water lily, locally known as ‘shapla’, blooms in different waterbodies during the rainy season. They also attract people during the autumn.

But the flower has been declining fast in the waterbodies of the area due to the construction of houses and establishments. People have been commercially rearing fish, especially the carp variety, in ponds and other waterbodies. These big fishes have been eating up the lily plants, resulting in their decline.

An elderly ‘kabiraj’, a practitioner of ayurvedic medicine, said he has been using the red and white lilies to cure dysentery, colic pain, liver and urinary problems, and other diseases. He also said that the red lily helps cure certain gynecological problems.

But now, his profession is suffering because of a shortage of flowers round the year. Huge quantities of shapla once used to be produced in Jagusha, Jaluli, Jadabpur, and other beel areas, he informed.

Abdus Satter of Jadabpur said the poor people of the bordering area eat shapla as a vegetable. It has a great demand even in the urban areas. But the supply of the flower is now dwindling.

According to the Department of Fisheries in Jhenidah, there are 7,500 hectares of waterbodies in the district. But lily is virtually absent in them.

Deputy Director of the Department of Agriculture Extension (DAE) in Jhenidah, Kripangshu Sekhar Biswas, said entrepreneurs should come forward to take initiatives to preserve water lily by farming the flower and the DAE could provide technical and extension support.

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Editor : M. Shamsur Rahman

Published by the Editor on behalf of Independent Publications Limited at Media Printers, 446/H, Tejgaon I/A, Dhaka-1215.
Editorial, News & Commercial Offices : Beximco Media Complex, 149-150 Tejgaon I/A, Dhaka-1208, Bangladesh. GPO Box No. 934, Dhaka-1000.

Editor : M. Shamsur Rahman
Published by the Editor on behalf of Independent Publications Limited at Media Printers, 446/H, Tejgaon I/A, Dhaka-1215.
Editorial, News & Commercial Offices : Beximco Media Complex, 149-150 Tejgaon I/A, Dhaka-1208, Bangladesh. GPO Box No. 934, Dhaka-1000.

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