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18 January, 2020 00:00 00 AM / LAST MODIFIED: 17 January, 2020 08:49:27 PM
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Panel finds FAA procedures in approving Boeing Max

AP, Dallas
Panel finds FAA procedures in approving Boeing Max

A government advisory committee has concluded that federal regulators followed established procedures when they certified the Boeing 737 Max and did not delegate too much safety analysis for the plane to Boeing.

In a report Thursday, the panel said the FAA correctly treated the Max as an update to older 737s and not as a new type of plane, which would have subjected it to more examination.

The committee was appointed by Transportation Secretary Elaine Chao in April, after crashes in Indonesia and Ethiopia killed 346 people. It gave high marks overall to FAA’s process for certifying planes, calling it safe and effective and a boost to the U.S. aerospace industry.

The committee’s findings differ sharply from those of legislators who are investigating Boeing and the FAA. Key lawmakers have said they may try to stop the FAA from letting Boeing do some inspections and safety analysis on its own planes.

House Transportation Committee Chairman Peter DeFazio, D-Ore., said his panel’s investigation has already found multiple times at which the certification process failed.

“I want to be very clear: 346 people died because the system failed,” DeFazio said. He said it would be irresponsible to make no changes “and just hope for the best the next time.”

Michael Stumo, whose daughter Samya was on the Max that crashed in Ethiopia, said the new report endorsed self-regulation by Boeing.

“This report is written as if by pre-crash industry lobbyists defending the current certification system,” he said.

The top Republican on the Transportation Committee praised the report, however. It confirms that the U.S. remains “the global gold standard for aviation safety,” and the current certification system does not need to be rebuilt because of the Max crashes, said Sam Graves of Missouri.

Boeing and the FAA said in brief statements that they would review the committee’s findings.

Investigations into Boeing have revealed internal documents in which Boeing employees raised safety alarms about the Max while it was being developed and admitted misleading regulators.

Lee Moak, a former airline pilot and union president who co-chaired the Chao-appointed committee, said the panel did not consider those messages.

“It was not the purview of, or charter of, the committee to look at or investigate email traffic,” Moak told reporters.

 

 

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Editor : M. Shamsur Rahman

Published by the Editor on behalf of Independent Publications Limited at Media Printers, 446/H, Tejgaon I/A, Dhaka-1215.
Editorial, News & Commercial Offices : Beximco Media Complex, 149-150 Tejgaon I/A, Dhaka-1208, Bangladesh. GPO Box No. 934, Dhaka-1000.

Editor : M. Shamsur Rahman
Published by the Editor on behalf of Independent Publications Limited at Media Printers, 446/H, Tejgaon I/A, Dhaka-1215.
Editorial, News & Commercial Offices : Beximco Media Complex, 149-150 Tejgaon I/A, Dhaka-1208, Bangladesh. GPO Box No. 934, Dhaka-1000.

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