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20 June, 2019 00:00 00 AM / LAST MODIFIED: 19 June, 2019 09:45:51 PM
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The need of foreign teachers

The countries that are offering these opportunities for the teachers can be motivated to take more of our teachers if they get expected feedback from the teachers who were trained by them
HASAN AL-MAHMUD
The need of foreign teachers

The government has decided to hire some foreign teachers to ensure quality education in Bangladesh. Learning this from the nation’s parliament last Thursday, I was inspired to write something related to this important issue.

Many people from our country participate in different international training programmes and even study abroad for developing education quality with a comfortable environment for Bangladeshi students. When they go abroad, attend training programmes, meet different people, cultivate their minds in a new angle, at that time they certainly get something new, achieve something special, learn some standard and successful methods of both teaching and learning. After completing the training programmes, they come back with wonderful experiences that might help them to encourage our education system to go in a better way. Have we ever utilized their experiences in improving our education?

I had a discussion with some highly talented teachers who had these experiences from abroad to find the answer to the question. In most cases, their responses came in the negative.

What they learned is neither not appropriate for the Bangladesh environment nor have they have ever been asked by the government to share their knowledge achieved from the training programmes.

Even, the government does not have any reserved data of the people who are receiving these training programmes as these are mostly conducted and funded by foreign countries.

Some examples can be found which are offered by the United States of America. Fulbright Teaching Excellence and Achievement (TEA) Programme, Fulbright Distinguish Award in Teaching for International Teachers (Fulbright DAI), International Leaders in Education Programme (ILEP), so on, are some wonderful programmes that take the teachers to the US and train them to further develop their expertise on their areas, enhance their teaching skills, and increase their knowledge about the United States. Many other countries including Canada, England, Australia, Japan, China, etc. are also helping our teachers through different programmes and training them in order to make them qualified for any environment. All these teachers are really a great resource for our education department, but it is now planning to hire foreign teachers.

But, this is disappointing to see that in all these programmes, what the participant teachers are learning is not been utilized properly when they are coming back to Bangladesh. I myself had a chance to participate in Fulbright Teaching Excellence and Achievement (TEA) Programme last year where I came to know about the curriculum development, lesson planning, instructional technology, new teaching methodologies, educational leadership and many others. It has been more than six months I have been waiting to apply what I learned from there as my current institution does not allow all of my learning to be implemented.

The countries that are offering these opportunities for the teachers can be motivated to take more of our teachers if they get expected feedback from the teachers who were trained by them.

Teachers are required to submit a feedback report on how their learning is giving output. If the teachers’ feedbacks are negative regarding implementation their methodologies, they might stop offering us opportunities for our teachers in the future.

This is why it is important to think about how we can use our teachers who already have been trained through different programmes to improve our education. If their learning outcomes are not employed properly, they might change the modules even into a new curriculum which could be more inappropriate for us.

We should take advantage and try to use some of the modules that can be suitable for our education system. In collaboration with the trained teachers, the government can take advantage of this decision very systematically. In the beginning, the government can organize a dialogue with the teachers who have expertise and experiences of foreign education and environment. These trained teachers should be enlisted to the government data center for the future query so that they can give ideas to the government and at the same time, they also will have a chance to apply what they have gathered abroad.

Although it is the lowest education budget with 2.1 percent of GDP among the South Asian countries, still I would like to thank the government for taking this step to bring foreign teachers. I think this initiative will bring a sustainable change in quality education as there will be an exchange opportunity through which our teachers will be updated and will get to know that has been practiced and taught around the world.

 this advantage, I believe, teachers will be confident, students will feel comfortable in the classroom and the education quality will enhance rapidly.

I am happy to see that the government has also declared that, in all areas of education beginning with the primary level, they want to engage their competent and trained teachers. This time they mentioned that they lack trained teachers. It indicates that they are at least aware of this issue.

I would be happier if I had found this ‘wanting’ (wishing) could be in a strong move with the word 'must' or 'have to'. As the government still wants it, many people, of course, might be confused about its successful and sustainable implementation.

The writer is an English language teacher at BIT School.

E-mail: mahmud138sms@gmail.com.  

 

 

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Published by the Editor on behalf of Independent Publications Limited at Media Printers, 446/H, Tejgaon I/A, Dhaka-1215.
Editorial, News & Commercial Offices : Beximco Media Complex, 149-150 Tejgaon I/A, Dhaka-1208, Bangladesh. GPO Box No. 934, Dhaka-1000.

Editor : M. Shamsur Rahman
Published by the Editor on behalf of Independent Publications Limited at Media Printers, 446/H, Tejgaon I/A, Dhaka-1215.
Editorial, News & Commercial Offices : Beximco Media Complex, 149-150 Tejgaon I/A, Dhaka-1208, Bangladesh. GPO Box No. 934, Dhaka-1000.

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