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26 June, 2019 10:07:06 AM
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For stomach cancer, aerosol chemotherapy offers breath of hope

AFP, France
For stomach cancer, aerosol chemotherapy offers breath of hope

“Classic chemotherapy was awful... but with this treatment, I feel hope,” says French pensioner Jacques Braud, who is undergoing treatment for stomach cancer with a new form of therapy dispersed by aerosol.

Several hours before going into theatre, Braud is waiting in his room, looking surprisingly relaxed with a book in hand.

This is a place he has been before. At the age of 76, Braud is about to face his second bout of chemotherapy after the cancer in his stomach spread to two other organs.

But this time it is different. He is being treated at the Georges-Francois Leclerc hospital in the eastern city of Dijon, one of seven hospitals in France that are trialling pressurised intraperitoneal aerosol chemotherapy, or PIPAC, a technique developed in Germany in 2013. Although is it still being tested, chemotherapy by aerosol has shown promising results against certain cancers, in a treatment with fewer side effects that offers hope to some of the weakest patients.

Unlike traditional chemotherapy, the drugs are not injected into the bloodstream.

Instead, the patient is put under general anaesthetic and the treatment introduced by laparoscopy, by which a small incision is made in the abdominal wall and the chemotherapy is introduced into the peritoneal cavity by an aerosol spray.

It is a minimally invasive procedure without the harmful side effects normally “associated with the circulation of the treatment within the blood”, says David Orry, who heads the hospital’s oncological surgery department.

“So you avoid the loss of appetite, the damage to peripheral nerves or to the red and white blood cells” which often require the treatment to be stopped.

“Chemo is horrendous, it destroys you,” says Braud, running his fingers through his short white hair that has barely grown back two months after his first bout of treatment.

“My fingers and toes are paralysed, I don’t feel anything,” he says, admitting it forced him to give up hiking, his passion.

But with the PIPAC therapy, he has not experienced any such side effects.

For now, he is receiving treatment every two to three weeks, alternating between traditional chemo and PIPAC therapy, whose use is still being studied.

BK

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Editor : M. Shamsur Rahman

Published by the Editor on behalf of Independent Publications Limited at Media Printers, 446/H, Tejgaon I/A, Dhaka-1215.
Editorial, News & Commercial Offices : Beximco Media Complex, 149-150 Tejgaon I/A, Dhaka-1208, Bangladesh. GPO Box No. 934, Dhaka-1000.

Editor : M. Shamsur Rahman
Published by the Editor on behalf of Independent Publications Limited at Media Printers, 446/H, Tejgaon I/A, Dhaka-1215.
Editorial, News & Commercial Offices : Beximco Media Complex, 149-150 Tejgaon I/A, Dhaka-1208, Bangladesh. GPO Box No. 934, Dhaka-1000.

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