Thursday 6 August 2020 ,
Thursday 6 August 2020 ,
Latest News
  • Bangladesh reports 39 more Covid-19 deaths, 2977 new cases
  • Bangladesh reports 39 more Covid-19 deaths, 2977 new cases
  • Kamal could give a lot to country: PM
  • 17 drown as trawler sinks in Netrakona haor
  • Sinha killing would not affect army-police relations: Army, police
  • 4 Bangladeshis killed in Beirut blast, 21 Navy members hurt
  • Japan to give $329m to Bangladesh to combat COVID-19: Abe
12 November, 2019 00:00 00 AM

WHO on diabetes

WHO
WHO on diabetes

Key facts

•    The number of people with diabetes has risen from 108 million in 1980 to 422 million in 2014.
•    The global prevalence of diabetes* among adults over 18 years of age has risen from 4.7% in 1980 to 8.5% in 2014.
•    Diabetes prevalence has been rising more rapidly in middle- and low-income countries.
•    Diabetes is a major cause of blindness, kidney failure, heart attacks, stroke and lower limb amputation.
•    In 2016, an estimated 1.6 million deaths were directly caused by diabetes. Another 2.2 million deaths were attributable to high blood glucose in 2012**.
•    Almost half of all deaths attributable to high blood glucose occur before the age of 70 years. WHO estimates that diabetes was the seventh leading cause of death in 2016.
•    Healthy diet, regular physical activity, maintaining a normal body weight and avoiding tobacco use are ways to prevent or delay the onset of type 2 diabetes.
•    Diabetes can be treated and its consequences avoided or delayed with diet, physical activity, medication and regular screening and treatment for complications.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

What is diabetes?

Diabetes is a chronic disease that occurs either when the pancreas does not produce enough insulin or when the body cannot effectively use the insulin it produces. Insulin is a hormone that regulates blood sugar. Hyperglycaemia, or raised blood sugar, is a common effect of uncontrolled diabetes and over time leads to serious damage to many of the body's systems, especially the nerves and blood vessels.

In 2014, 8.5% of adults aged 18 years and older had diabetes. In 2016, diabetes was the direct cause of 1.6 million deaths and in 2012 high blood glucose was the cause of another 2.2 million deaths.

Type 1 diabetes

Type 1 diabetes (previously known as insulin-dependent, juvenile or childhood-onset) is characterized by deficient insulin production and requires daily administration of insulin. The cause of type 1 diabetes is not known and it is not preventable with current knowledge.

Symptoms include excessive excretion of urine (polyuria), thirst (polydipsia), constant hunger, weight loss, vision changes, and fatigue. These symptoms may occur suddenly.

Type 2 diabetes

Type 2 diabetes (formerly called non-insulin-dependent, or adult-onset) results from the body’s ineffective use of insulin. Type 2 diabetes comprises the majority of people with diabetes around the world, and is largely the result of excess body weight and physical inactivity.

Symptoms may be similar to those of type 1 diabetes, but are often less marked. As a result, the disease may be diagnosed several years after onset, once complications have already arisen.

Until recently, this type of diabetes was seen only in adults but it is now also occurring increasingly frequently in children.

Gestational diabetes

Gestational diabetes is hyperglycaemia with blood glucose values above normal but below those diagnostic of diabetes, occurring during pregnancy.

Women with gestational diabetes are at an increased risk of complications during pregnancy and at delivery. They and their children are also at increased risk of type 2 diabetes in the future.

Gestational diabetes is diagnosed through prenatal screening, rather than through reported symptoms.

Impaired glucose tolerance and impaired fasting glycaemia

Impaired glucose tolerance (IGT) and impaired fasting glycaemia (IFG) are intermediate conditions in the transition between normality and diabetes. People with IGT or IFG are at high risk of progressing to type 2 diabetes, although this is not inevitable.

What are common consequences of diabetes?

Over time, diabetes can damage the heart, blood vessels, eyes, kidneys, and nerves.

Adults with diabetes have a two- to three-fold increased risk of heart attacks and strokes.

Combined with reduced blood flow, neuropathy (nerve damage) in the feet increases the chance of foot ulcers, infection and eventual need for limb amputation.

Diabetic retinopathy is an important cause of blindness, and occurs as a result of long-term accumulated damage to the small blood vessels in the retina. 2.6% of global blindness can be attributed to diabetes.

Diabetes is among the leading causes of kidney failure.

How can the burden of diabetes be reduced?

Prevention

Simple lifestyle measures have been shown to be effective in preventing or delaying the onset of type 2 diabetes. To help prevent type 2 diabetes and its complications, people should:

achieve and maintain healthy body weight;

be physically active – at least 30 minutes of regular, moderate-intensity activity on most days. More activity is required for weight control;

eat a healthy diet, avoiding sugar and saturated fats intake; and

avoid tobacco use – smoking increases the risk of diabetes and cardiovascular diseases.

Diagnosis and treatment

Early diagnosis can be accomplished through relatively inexpensive testing of blood sugar.

Treatment of diabetes involves diet and physical activity along with lowering blood glucose and the levels of other known risk factors that damage blood vessels. Tobacco use cessation is also important to avoid complications.

Interventions that are both cost-saving and feasible in developing countries include:

blood glucose control, particularly in type 1 diabetes. People with type 1 diabetes require insulin, people with type 2 diabetes can be treated with oral medication, but may also require insulin;

blood pressure control; and

foot care.

Other cost saving interventions include:

screening and treatment for retinopathy (which causes blindness)

blood lipid control (to regulate cholesterol levels)

screening for early signs of diabetes-related kidney disease and treatment.

WHO response

WHO aims to stimulate and support the adoption of effective measures for the surveillance, prevention and control of diabetes and its complications, particularly in low and middle-income countries. To this end, WHO:

provides scientific guidelines for the prevention of major noncommunicable diseases including diabetes;

develops norms and standards for diabetes diagnosis and care;

builds awareness on the global epidemic of diabetes, marking World Diabetes Day (14 November); and

conducts surveillance of diabetes and its risk factors.

The WHO "Global report on diabetes" provides an overview of the diabetes burden, the interventions available to prevent and manage diabetes, and recommendations for governments, individuals, the civil society and the private sector.

The WHO "Global strategy on diet, physical activity and health" complements WHO's diabetes work by focusing on population-wide approaches to promote healthy diet and regular physical activity, thereby reducing the growing global problem of overweight people and obesity.

Defined as fasting blood glucose equal to or higher than 7 mmol/L, or on medication for raised blood glucose, or with a history of diagnosis of diabetes.

*High blood glucose is defined as a distribution of fasting plasma glucose in a population that is higher than the theoretical distribution that would minimize risks to health (derived from epidemiological studies). High blood glucose is a statistical concept, not a clinical or diagnostic category.

 

Comments

Most Viewed
Digital Edition
More story
Editor Speaks

Editor Speaks

Tuberculosis is an age old disease and first spread probably 8000 years back. Killer T.B was described in India 3000 B.C. Mummified bodies of Egypt have…
World Tuberculosis Day 2020

World Tuberculosis Day 2020

Each year, we commemorate World Tuberculosis (TB) Day on March 24 to raise public awareness about the devastating health, social and economic consequences…
Tuberculosis (TB): Symptoms, causes & treatment

Tuberculosis (TB): Symptoms, causes & treatment

What is Tuberculosis? Tuberculosis -- or TB, as it’s commonly called -- is a contagious infection that usually attacks your lungs. It can spread…
WHO on Tuberculosis

WHO on Tuberculosis

Key facts •    A total of 1.5 million people died from TB in 2018 (including 251 000 people with HIV). Worldwide, TB is one of the…
Hearing loss screening for patients with TB and diabetes urged

Hearing loss screening for patients with TB and diabetes urged

MUHAMAMD ZAHIR HASSAN NABIL On this World Tuberculosis Day, Bangladesh remains one of 30 high TB and MDR-TB burden countries with 221 people affected…
Autism rates declining among wealthy whites, escalating among poor

Autism rates declining among wealthy whites, escalating among poor

Wealthy, white California counties—once considered the nation's hotbeds for autism spectrum disorder (ASD) - have seen prevalence flatten or…
What is Coronavirus (COVID-19)?

What is Coronavirus (COVID-19)?

COLLEEN DOHERTY, MD   The 2019 Novel Coronavirus (COVID-19) Outbreak COVID-19 is a new type of coronavirus, a common family of viruses, which surfaced…
Coronavirus patients, doctors seem to be temporarily losing their sense of taste and smell — here’s why

Coronavirus patients, doctors seem to be temporarily losing their sense of taste and smell — here’s why

ABBY HAGLAGE Healthcare workers wait for people to arrive at a COVID-19 mobile testing site in Florida. New reports from the UK show that both doctors…
10 common health conditions that may increase risk of death from the coronavirus, including diabetes and heart disease

10 common health conditions that may increase risk of death from the coronavirus, including diabetes and heart disease

According to a report on patient characteristics from Italy's National Institute of Health released on March 17, 99% of COVID-19 patients who have…
Coronavirus: Doctors urge conversations about dying

Coronavirus: Doctors urge conversations about dying

DR FAYE KIRKLAND Palliative care doctors are urging people to have a conversation about what they would want if they, or their loved ones, became seriously…
What does a self-quarantine look like?

What does a self-quarantine look like?

Many peoples are choosing -- or have been told -- to self-quarantine to slow the spread of COVID-19. Doctors at the University of Texas Health Science…
ACE inhibitors and angiotensin receptor blockers may increase the risk of severe COVID-19

ACE inhibitors and angiotensin receptor blockers may increase the risk of severe COVID-19

James Diaz, MD, MHA, MPH & TM, Dr. PH, Professor and Head of Environmental Health Sciences at LSU Health New Orleans School of Public Health, has…
FDA approves Nurtec ODT (rimegepant) for the acute treatment of migraine in adults

FDA approves Nurtec ODT (rimegepant) for the acute treatment of migraine in adults

Biohaven Pharmaceutical Holding Company Ltd. recently announced that the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) has approved Nurtec ODT (rimegepant)…

Copyright © All right reserved.

Editor : M. Shamsur Rahman

Published by the Editor on behalf of Independent Publications Limited at Media Printers, 446/H, Tejgaon I/A, Dhaka-1215.
Editorial, News & Commercial Offices : Beximco Media Complex, 149-150 Tejgaon I/A, Dhaka-1208, Bangladesh. GPO Box No. 934, Dhaka-1000.

Editor : M. Shamsur Rahman
Published by the Editor on behalf of Independent Publications Limited at Media Printers, 446/H, Tejgaon I/A, Dhaka-1215.
Editorial, News & Commercial Offices : Beximco Media Complex, 149-150 Tejgaon I/A, Dhaka-1208, Bangladesh. GPO Box No. 934, Dhaka-1000.

Disclaimer & Privacy Policy
....................................................
About Us
....................................................
Contact Us
....................................................
Advertisement
....................................................
Subscription

Powered by : Frog Hosting