Wednesday 18 September 2019 ,
Wednesday 18 September 2019 ,
Latest News
  • Nursing education to be upgraded: PM
  • Open your eyes: UN envoy to Suu Kyi
  • Trump to meet Imran, Modi for talks focusing on Kashmir
  • Bangladesh to seek expeditious global efforts to resolve Rohingya crisis
  • Dhaka ranks 7th worst in Air Quality Index
  • 536 new dengue patients hospitalised in 24 hrs: DGHS
19 August, 2019 00:00 00 AM

Deadly new fungal superbug is worrying doctors — here's what you need to know

Yahoo Style
Deadly new fungal superbug is worrying doctors — here's what you need to know

ABBY HAGLAGE

Months after health officials in New York, New Jersey and Illinois raised concerns about a new deadly fungal superbug, a study has suggested climate change may be playing a role in its troubling rise.

“Candida auris fungus” (C. auris) is a multi-drug–resistant fungal infection that spreads in hospitals and is extremely deadly — killing as many as one in three who get it, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC).

While there are likely many reasons that the infection has now spread to 30 countries, authors of the study — published this week in the journal mBio — are blaming climate change. The researchers say global warming has played a “pivotal role” in the infection’s rise, citing the fungus’s ability to “grow at higher temperatures.”

"What this study suggests is this is the beginning of fungi adapting to higher temperatures, and we are going to have more and more problems as the century goes on," Arturo Casadevall, MD, PhD, and Molecular Microbiology and Immunology chair at Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health said. "Global warming will lead to selection of fungal lineages that are more thermally tolerant.”

As scientists continue to unpack what’s fueling the rise of this infection, here’s what those who are vulnerable to it need to know.

The infection started in Japan.

C. auris was initially discovered in a Japanese man with an ear infection in 2009. It first appeared in the U.S. in 2013, specifically in a series of patients at a New Jersey hospital. Since then, the CDC has tracked over 700 cases nationwide.

Symptoms are difficult to pinpoint.

According to a CDC fact sheet, the fungus can cause “blood stream infections” and is often spread in hospitals and between nursing home patients. Symptoms are contingent on which part of the body has become infected with the illness, but can include chills and fever. A laboratory test is needed to confirm that it is C. auris that’s present, at which point treatment (often with multiple anti-fungal medications) begins.

Hospital patients and the elderly are most at risk.

Like other drug-resistant infections such as C.difficle, C. auris poses the most risk to individuals whose immune systems are already compromised — such as those in the hospital, elderly people and those who use breathing tubes. The CDC notes that “healthy people usually don’t get C. auris infections.”

New York has the highest cases, likely due to travel.

In an email to Yahoo Lifestyle, Michael Phillips, MD, chief epidemiologists and associate professor of infectious diseases at NYU Langone Health, says that C. auris is “following the same pattern” as another drug-resistant bacteria, one which started in New York and then spread nationwide. “This is likely due to travel to and from the NYC area,” he says.

It may not technically be a “superbug.”

The Mayo Clinic defines superbugs as “strains of bacteria that are resistant to the majority of antibiotics commonly used today,” but although many have been referring to C. auris as one, Phillips doesn’t necessarily agree. “In spite of the hype, I would not call C auris a superbug,” says Phillips. His reasoning, in part, is that not all C. auris infections are resistant to drugs.

There is no need to panic.

In an editorial for the Harvard Medical School in May, Robert H. Shmerling, MD, noted that while C. auris is a dangerous infection, panic among the general population is not warranted. “Fortunately, Candida auris has not spread to wide swaths of the population, and healthy people rarely develop the infection,” he writes. “When it comes to infectious disease, it’s never time to panic. Instead, you can take constructive steps to deal with concerns about a wide array of infections, even the deadliest ones.”

A great way to start, he says, is regularly washing your hands, receiving all your vaccinations and avoiding people who are contagious.

 

Comments

Most Viewed
Digital Edition
More story
Editor Speaks

Editor Speaks

Communication between organs to organs is vital and this is done by a chemical messenger comprising feedback loops of hormones released by internal organs…
How to keep your legs healthy?

How to keep your legs healthy?

In this fast changing world, you will be hearing quite often your family members especially in their fifties complaining now and then about all kinds…
What are hormones?

What are hormones?

A hormone is a chemical released by one or more cells that affects cells in other parts of the organism. Only a small amount of hormone is required to…
What to know about hormonal imbalances

What to know about hormonal imbalances

Hormonal imbalances occur when there is too much or too little of a hormone in the bloodstream. Because of their essential role in the body, even small…
Adrenal fatigue is the root of many illnesses

Adrenal fatigue is the root of many illnesses

ALEX HOWARD The adrenal glands sit on top of the kidneys and produce a number of hormones such as adrenalin, noradrenalin, cortisol and DHEA. These hormones…
Andropause

Andropause

Andropause, also sometimes called male menopause, is an acquired type of hypogonadism caused by the gradual decline of testosterone levels as a result…
Can gut bacteria affect how we store fat?

Can gut bacteria affect how we store fat?

DARLA LEAL Gut bacteria or microbes live in our digestive tract helping us digest food, prevent infection, and shown to play a role in our physical fitness.…
How old is too old to go to the pediatrician?

How old is too old to go to the pediatrician?

For most parents, getting started with a pediatrician is the easy part. Chances are that even before you gave birth, you had researched doctors certified…
Britain slumps to bottom of cancer survival league tables – and is two decades behind some countries

Britain slumps to bottom of cancer survival league tables – and is two decades behind some countries

 LAURA DONNELLY   Britain is bottom of international league tables for cancer survival – and is lagging two decades behind some countries…
Hypertension: The No. 1 sign you have high blood pressure

Hypertension: The No. 1 sign you have high blood pressure

KORIN MILLER  Hypertension is known as the “silent killer” and it’s not something that you want to mess with. One in three Americans…
Prof. Dr. Afzal performed the first  zero-contrast angioplasty  in Bangladesh

Prof. Dr. Afzal performed the first zero-contrast angioplasty in Bangladesh

Zero-contrast angioplasty was done, for the first time in Bangladesh, on 30 July 2019 in the National Institute of Cardiovascular Diseases (NICVD). Prof.…
Heavy menstrual bleeding: Keyhole hysterectomy technique 'more effective'

Heavy menstrual bleeding: Keyhole hysterectomy technique 'more effective'

A keyhole-surgery technique for treating heavy menstrual bleeding is more effective and just as safe as a non-invasive alternative, a study of more than…
Full chemo doses may improve survival in breast cancer

Full chemo doses may improve survival in breast cancer

Maintaining full doses of chemotherapy, especially early in the treatment course, is important for survival of intermediate or high-risk breast cancer…
Anti-addiction meds can help teen Opioid abusers

Anti-addiction meds can help teen Opioid abusers

The epidemic of opioid addiction and abuse ravaging the United States is also affecting teenagers. Now, research confirms that anti-addiction medications…

Copyright © All right reserved.

Editor : M. Shamsur Rahman

Published by the Editor on behalf of Independent Publications Limited at Media Printers, 446/H, Tejgaon I/A, Dhaka-1215.
Editorial, News & Commercial Offices : Beximco Media Complex, 149-150 Tejgaon I/A, Dhaka-1208, Bangladesh. GPO Box No. 934, Dhaka-1000.

Editor : M. Shamsur Rahman
Published by the Editor on behalf of Independent Publications Limited at Media Printers, 446/H, Tejgaon I/A, Dhaka-1215.
Editorial, News & Commercial Offices : Beximco Media Complex, 149-150 Tejgaon I/A, Dhaka-1208, Bangladesh. GPO Box No. 934, Dhaka-1000.

Disclaimer & Privacy Policy
....................................................
About Us
....................................................
Contact Us
....................................................
Advertisement
....................................................
Subscription

Powered by : Frog Hosting