Monday 24 February 2020 ,
Monday 24 February 2020 ,
Latest News
  • GP pays BTRC Tk 1,000cr
  • HC seeks report on Khaleda’s health condition
  • Angelina Jolie appreciates Bangladesh’s leadership role in Rohingya crisis
  • 18 injured as private car ploughs through crowd in Kurmitola
  • Khaleda to be granted bail, hopes Fakhrul
  • Appellate Division upholds bail of Sigma Huda, two daughters
  • FM hopeful of reopening labour market in Malaysia soon
  • Shanto, Mominul hit fifties as Tigers trail by 25 runs
19 August, 2019 00:00 00 AM

OB/GYNs explain when you should (and shouldn’t) worry about period blood clots

Prevention
OB/GYNs explain when you should (and shouldn’t) worry about period blood clots

KAITLYN PIRIE

Even though blood clots sound scary, they’re usually a good thing. When you experience an injury—say, you accidentally cut yourself—your blood cells and proteins in your body join forces to form a clot and prevent excessive bleeding.

But those jelly-like blobs that appear during your period are a bit different than other types of blood clots. They include a mix of “various kinds of tissue products like coagulated blood, dead cells, and the top layer of the endometrium of the uterus—the lining,” says Adeeti Gupta, MD, founder of Walk In GYN Care.

And while blood clots during your period can be a totally natural part of the process, they’re often a sign of a heavy flow, which can sometimes point to certain health problems. So, what exactly is going on in your uterus? Here, gynecologists to explain when you should (and shouldn’t) worry about menstrual clots.

Are blood clots normal during your period?

Most of the time, blood clots are simply just a part of menstruation. “A usual cycle is anywhere between 21 and 45 days and can change potentially on a monthly basis,” explains Carrie Coleman, MD, a clinical instructor in the Massachusetts General Hospital Department of Obstetrics & Gynecology. “A usual flow may last anywhere from three to five to up to seven days and it may start off light, get heavy, and slowly resolve.”

Small blood clots—say, dime- or nickel-sized on your heaviest flow days—may appear during this time and that’s not uncommon, especially if you feel fine otherwise and you’re not experiencing any other unusual symptoms during your period.

It’s also typical for the color of these clots to vary from light to dark shades of red.

When should you worry about blood clots during your period?

Menstrual bleeding that lasts more than seven days, known as menorrhagia, can be a signal of a larger health issue. If your clots are accompanied with any of the following symptoms, you should reach out to your gynecologist:

New blood clots that haven’t appeared in the past

Blood clots larger than a quarter

Bleeding for more than seven to 10 days

Heavy bleeding that requires you to change your pad/tampon every hour

Consistent spotting in the middle of your menstrual cycle

Excessive pain or cramping

What are the potential causes of large blood clots during your period?

If you are experiencing unusually large blood clots during your period, don’t freak out. It doesn’t always mean there’s something wrong, and every woman has her own version of “normal.” However, there are certain conditions that large blood clots and a heavier flow during your period can point to, including:

Uterine fibroids: These noncancerous growths of the uterus may form during your reproductive years. They don’t always cause symptoms, but can lead to heavy bleeding, long periods, and pelvic pain.

Endometriosis: This condition occurs when the tissue that lines the inner portion of your uterus (the endometrium) grows outside of the uterus, often spreading to other pelvic organs. Endometriosis can cause painful periods, painful sex, heavy bleeding, and even infertility.

Adenomyosis: This condition occurs when the endometrial tissue grows into the muscular walls of the uterus, resulting in longer, heavier periods, severe cramping, or pelvic pain.

Polycystic ovary syndrome: PCOS is a hormonal disorder characterized by high levels of androgens (male hormones), sometimes leading to the development of small cysts in the ovaries. This can cause irregular periods, as well as thinning hair, acne, and weight gain.

Other hormonal imbalances: Hypothyroidism, perimenopause, and menopause can all cause fluctuations in your menstrual cycle and result in clots.

Miscarriage: “A woman may experience blood clots if she is miscarrying as well,” says Dr. Gupta. This can occur before you even realize you’re pregnant.

Cancer: In some cases, blood clots during your period can be a sign of uterine or cervical cancer, but this is very rare.

If you suddenly experience dizziness or weakness with the clotting, head to an urgent care facility.

How to prevent blood clots during your period

Hormonal birth control can help keep your period in check, says Dr. Coleman, but if you’d rather not use hormonal contraception or are trying to conceive, taking ibuprofen up to three times a day on your heaviest days can reduce your flow and ease cramping.

“A healthy diet and lifestyle can actually help balance out hormones and excessive bleeding that is related to hormonal changes,” says Dr. Gupta. “However, if bleeding is due to actual anatomical problems such as fibroids, then those will need to be addressed.”

Your best bet? See your OB/GYN if you think the blood clots during your period may be pointing to something more serious. He or she can help provide an individualized treatment plan for you.

The bottom line: Your menstrual cycle can tell you a lot about your health.

Thankfully, period tracking apps make it a cinch to stay on top of your cycle length as well as symptoms like cramping, headaches, and flow intensity. Get to know your body and find a gynecologist you feel comfortable seeing if issues arise.

 

Comments

Most Viewed
Digital Edition
More story
Editor Speaks

Editor Speaks

15-20 cm long partly exocrine (digestive juice) and partly endocrine (insulin) Pancreas means all flesh (Pan=all, Kreas=flesh) which lies behind peritoneum…
What can doctors do for your back pain? Not as much as you can

What can doctors do for your back pain? Not as much as you can

“I’m sorry you’re in pain.” “You have no idea,” she growls. She is a middle-aged, obese woman with chronic back pain…
Everything you need to know about pancreatitis

Everything you need to know about pancreatitis

Pancreatitis is pathologic inflammation of the pancreas. Your pancreas sits behind your stomach, near your small intestine. It releases enzymes that help…
Acute pancreatitis risks and treatment

Acute pancreatitis risks and treatment

Risk stratification of acute pancreatitis In most cases, acute pancreatitis resolves with therapy, but approximately 15% of patients develop severe disease.3…
Alcohol, loneliness & other surprising things that spike your blood pressure

Alcohol, loneliness & other surprising things that spike your blood pressure

STEPHANIE ECKELKAMP They don’t call high blood pressure a “silent killer” for nothing. Turns out, about half of Americans have this…
Knowing the warning signs and symptoms of congenital atrial septal defect (ASD)

Knowing the warning signs and symptoms of congenital atrial septal defect (ASD)

The statistical data reveals that the average incidence rate of congenital heart defects reported in different studies is 1 up to 8 per 1,000 live births.…
Coronavirus and its symptoms

Coronavirus and its symptoms

JAMES GALLAGHER A virus causing severe lung disease that started in China has spread to other countries, including the UK. The coronavirus had infected…
Common causes of waking to urinate at night

Common causes of waking to urinate at night

BRANDON PETERS, MD If you wake during the night to pee, you may be interested in learning about the common causes of this occurrence. What is nocturia?…
Wheeze, asthma risk up with cleaning product use exposure in infancy

Wheeze, asthma risk up with cleaning product use exposure in infancy

Infants in homes with frequent use of household cleaning products have an increased risk for childhood wheeze and asthma, according to a study published…
Healthy 'Mediterranean Diet' is good for your microbiome

Healthy 'Mediterranean Diet' is good for your microbiome

The so-called Mediterranean diet is already considered one of the healthiest for your heart, and now scientists say it may give your gut bacteria a boost,…
U.S. scientists take key step towards Coronavirus vaccine

U.S. scientists take key step towards Coronavirus vaccine

There's been a crucial move forward in efforts to develop vaccines and treatments against the new COVID-19 coronavirus, U.S. researchers say. As of…
FDA approves Twirla (levonorgestrel and ethinyl estradiol) contraceptive patch

FDA approves Twirla (levonorgestrel and ethinyl estradiol) contraceptive patch

Agile Therapeutics, Inc.,  a forward-thinking women’s healthcare company, recently announced that the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA)…

Copyright © All right reserved.

Editor : M. Shamsur Rahman

Published by the Editor on behalf of Independent Publications Limited at Media Printers, 446/H, Tejgaon I/A, Dhaka-1215.
Editorial, News & Commercial Offices : Beximco Media Complex, 149-150 Tejgaon I/A, Dhaka-1208, Bangladesh. GPO Box No. 934, Dhaka-1000.

Editor : M. Shamsur Rahman
Published by the Editor on behalf of Independent Publications Limited at Media Printers, 446/H, Tejgaon I/A, Dhaka-1215.
Editorial, News & Commercial Offices : Beximco Media Complex, 149-150 Tejgaon I/A, Dhaka-1208, Bangladesh. GPO Box No. 934, Dhaka-1000.

Disclaimer & Privacy Policy
....................................................
About Us
....................................................
Contact Us
....................................................
Advertisement
....................................................
Subscription

Powered by : Frog Hosting