Friday 6 December 2019 ,
Friday 6 December 2019 ,
Latest News
  • Khaleda’s bail hearing deferred until Dec 12
  • 58 migrants dead as boat capsizes off Mauritania: UN
  • Trump calls Trudeau 'two-faced' at Nato summit
  • ACC okays charge sheet against ex-CJ Sinha
  • No relief for consumers as onion prices still soar
  • Normalcy returns to BUET, JU
  • AL likely to induct fresh blood into central body
  • PM urges nation to stay alert against arsonists return
  • BPL teams start practice at Mirpur
  • Suhrawardy’s death anniv today
15 July, 2019 00:00 00 AM

Hospitalized pneumonia patients often get excess antibiotics

drugs.com
Hospitalized pneumonia patients often get excess antibiotics

Patients hospitalized with pneumonia often receive excess antibiotic therapy, according to a study published online July 9 in the Annals of Internal Medicine.

Valerie M. Vaughn, M.D., from the University of Michigan in Ann Arbor, and colleagues examined predictors and outcomes associated with excess duration of antibiotic treatment using retrospective data from 43 hospitals in the Michigan Hospital Medicine Safety Consortium (6,481 general care medical patients with pneumonia). Excess days were determined by subtracting each patient's expected treatment duration (based on time to clinical stability, pathogen, and pneumonia classification) from the actual duration.

The researchers found that more than two-thirds of patients (67.8 percent) received excess antibiotic therapy, with most of the excess duration accounted for by antibiotics prescribed at discharge (93.2 percent).

Excess treatment was more likely among patients who had respiratory cultures or nonculture diagnostic testing, had a longer stay, received a high-risk antibiotic in the previous 90 days, had community-acquired pneumonia, or did not have a total antibiotic treatment duration documented at discharge.

Lower rates of adverse outcomes, including death, readmission, emergency department visit, or Clostridioides difficile infection, were not associated with excess treatment. However, there was a 5 percent increase in the odds of antibiotic-associated adverse events postdischarge with each excess day of treatment.

"Future interventions should focus on whether reducing excess treatment and improving documentation at discharge improves outcomes," the authors write.

 

Comments

Most Viewed
Digital Edition
More story
Editor Speaks

Editor Speaks

World AIDS Day is observed on 1st December every year. AIDS means Acquired Immune Deficiency Syndrome. It is caused by Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV)…
WHO on HIV/AIDS

WHO on HIV/AIDS

The human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) targets the immune system and weakens people's defence systems against infections and some types of cancer.…
The AIDS epidemic: Public health importance of case reports - an example

The AIDS epidemic: Public health importance of case reports - an example

December 1, is observed as World AIDS Day every year from 1988 to raise awareness and bring people together in the fight against HIV/AIDS. AIDS is the…
HIV and AIDS in Asia & the Pacific: Regional overview

HIV and AIDS in Asia & the Pacific: Regional overview

                  The Asia and Pacific region was home to an estimated 5.9 million people living with HIV…
What is thrombocytopenia?

What is thrombocytopenia?

AMBER YATES, MD Thrombocytopenia is the medical term to describe a low platelet count. Platelets are one of our blood cells and their job is to help us…
Are low-calorie sweeteners good or bad for you?

Are low-calorie sweeteners good or bad for you?

CHRISTINE LEHMAN, MA   Marquita Adams, 46 of Alexandria, VA, whips out her little bottle of Splenda Zero from her pocket and squirts it twice into…
The 2nd International Symposium on ‘Community Health Workers 2019’ concludes in Dhaka

The 2nd International Symposium on ‘Community Health Workers 2019’ concludes in Dhaka

The 2nd International Symposium on ‘Community Health Workers 2019’ concluded on November 24, 2019 at a local hotel in Dhaka. The symposium…
Smartphone 'addiction': Young people 'panicky' when denied mobiles

Smartphone 'addiction': Young people 'panicky' when denied mobiles

SEAN COUGHLAN   Almost a quarter of young people are so dependent on their smartphones that it becomes like an addiction, research by psychiatrists…
Ketamine may reduce heavy drinkers' craving

Ketamine may reduce heavy drinkers' craving

A one-off dose of ketamine may help heavy drinkers cut back on alcohol, an experimental trial by University College London suggests. When the sedative…
FDA approves Xcopri (cenobamate) for the treatment of partial-onset seizures in adults

FDA approves Xcopri (cenobamate) for the treatment of partial-onset seizures in adults

SK Biopharmaceuticals, Co., Ltd., an innovative global pharmaceutical company focused on developing and bringing treatments to market for central nervous…

Copyright © All right reserved.

Editor : M. Shamsur Rahman

Published by the Editor on behalf of Independent Publications Limited at Media Printers, 446/H, Tejgaon I/A, Dhaka-1215.
Editorial, News & Commercial Offices : Beximco Media Complex, 149-150 Tejgaon I/A, Dhaka-1208, Bangladesh. GPO Box No. 934, Dhaka-1000.

Editor : M. Shamsur Rahman
Published by the Editor on behalf of Independent Publications Limited at Media Printers, 446/H, Tejgaon I/A, Dhaka-1215.
Editorial, News & Commercial Offices : Beximco Media Complex, 149-150 Tejgaon I/A, Dhaka-1208, Bangladesh. GPO Box No. 934, Dhaka-1000.

Disclaimer & Privacy Policy
....................................................
About Us
....................................................
Contact Us
....................................................
Advertisement
....................................................
Subscription

Powered by : Frog Hosting