Friday 6 December 2019 ,
Friday 6 December 2019 ,
Latest News
  • Khaleda’s bail hearing deferred until Dec 12
  • 58 migrants dead as boat capsizes off Mauritania: UN
  • Trump calls Trudeau 'two-faced' at Nato summit
  • ACC okays charge sheet against ex-CJ Sinha
  • No relief for consumers as onion prices still soar
  • Normalcy returns to BUET, JU
  • AL likely to induct fresh blood into central body
  • PM urges nation to stay alert against arsonists return
  • BPL teams start practice at Mirpur
  • Suhrawardy’s death anniv today
15 July, 2019 00:00 00 AM

Vaginal bacteria linked to ovarian cancer

BBC News Health
Vaginal bacteria linked to ovarian cancer

Having too few "friendly" vaginal bacteria may increase a woman's chance of ovarian cancer, and swabs can be used to spot this, say researchers. The team, led by University College London, hope the finding could be used to identify women at high risk of the cancer, which has no screening test.

However, they say that more work is needed to explore this. It is too soon to recommend women should be given protective doses of the good bacteria, they say. The work, which is published in the Lancet Oncology, was funded by money from the government's tampon tax, as well as grants from the EU and the Eve Appeal charity.

About ovarian cancer

More than 7,300 women are diagnosed with ovarian cancer each year in the UK. Diagnosing it early improves the chances of successful treatment, but the symptoms - bloating and discomfort - can be mistaken for more common, less serious conditions, such as menstrual cramps or irritable bowel syndrome. Many women are not diagnosed until the cancer has already started to spread. If your doctor thinks your symptoms could be due to ovarian cancer they will recommend blood tests and scans.

The exact cause of ovarian cancer is unknown, but certain factors increase a woman's risk: age, a family history of ovarian or breast cancer and being overweight. Now researchers believe micro-organisms living inside our bodies may also play a role.

Microbiome link

There is growing scientific evidence that the community of bacteria and other microbes that reside inside us - our microbiome - influence our wellbeing and health. One species of beneficial bacteria that is thought to be particularly important in the vagina is called lactobacillus. Experts believe it stops other unhelpful or bad microbes from taking up residence and causing harm.

The study involved 176 women with ovarian cancer, 109 with inherited high-risk genes for ovarian cancer (BRCA1 genes) and 295 women with no known genetic risk. The women were examined and samples taken using the same collection method used in cervical screening. Lactobacilli levels were significantly lower in the women under 50 with ovarian cancer or high-risk cancer genes.

What do the findings mean?

It is not clear whether this link is causal or if other factors might explain it, or how much of an impact it has on risk. Helen Callard, from Cancer Research UK, said:

"The microbiome is a really interesting area of research and we're slowly putting pieces together about how our natural bacteria might affect our health. But when interpreting research like this, association doesn't mean causation.

"There are several factors that could influence the risk of ovarian cancer, and different things that can affect the make-up of vaginal bacteria - and it's not always easy to separate these elements. So we need to know how vaginal bacteria might directly affect the risk of developing ovarian cancer. Or whether it's a different factor entirely."

Alexandra Holden, from Target Ovarian Cancer, said: "Before women become concerned about the bacteria in their vagina, more research is required to better understand how the vaginal microbiome may contribute to ovarian cancer, and find better ways to detect the disease.

In the meantime, it is crucial for women to be aware of the symptoms, and to visit the GP with any concerns."

The investigators believe good bugs provide a protective barrier to other infections, stopping them from travelling up the gynaecological tract to the fallopian tubes and ovaries. Researcher Prof Martin Widschwendter said: "We do not yet know for sure whether low levels of the beneficial bacteria leads to an increased risk of ovarian cancer, but that is what we suspect.

"It fits with other research. It's been shown that women who use excessive vaginal hygiene products have lower levels of this bacterium too, and they are at increased risk of ovarian cancer."

Comments

Most Viewed
Digital Edition
More story
Editor Speaks

Editor Speaks

World AIDS Day is observed on 1st December every year. AIDS means Acquired Immune Deficiency Syndrome. It is caused by Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV)…
WHO on HIV/AIDS

WHO on HIV/AIDS

The human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) targets the immune system and weakens people's defence systems against infections and some types of cancer.…
The AIDS epidemic: Public health importance of case reports - an example

The AIDS epidemic: Public health importance of case reports - an example

December 1, is observed as World AIDS Day every year from 1988 to raise awareness and bring people together in the fight against HIV/AIDS. AIDS is the…
HIV and AIDS in Asia & the Pacific: Regional overview

HIV and AIDS in Asia & the Pacific: Regional overview

                  The Asia and Pacific region was home to an estimated 5.9 million people living with HIV…
What is thrombocytopenia?

What is thrombocytopenia?

AMBER YATES, MD Thrombocytopenia is the medical term to describe a low platelet count. Platelets are one of our blood cells and their job is to help us…
Are low-calorie sweeteners good or bad for you?

Are low-calorie sweeteners good or bad for you?

CHRISTINE LEHMAN, MA   Marquita Adams, 46 of Alexandria, VA, whips out her little bottle of Splenda Zero from her pocket and squirts it twice into…
The 2nd International Symposium on ‘Community Health Workers 2019’ concludes in Dhaka

The 2nd International Symposium on ‘Community Health Workers 2019’ concludes in Dhaka

The 2nd International Symposium on ‘Community Health Workers 2019’ concluded on November 24, 2019 at a local hotel in Dhaka. The symposium…
Smartphone 'addiction': Young people 'panicky' when denied mobiles

Smartphone 'addiction': Young people 'panicky' when denied mobiles

SEAN COUGHLAN   Almost a quarter of young people are so dependent on their smartphones that it becomes like an addiction, research by psychiatrists…
Ketamine may reduce heavy drinkers' craving

Ketamine may reduce heavy drinkers' craving

A one-off dose of ketamine may help heavy drinkers cut back on alcohol, an experimental trial by University College London suggests. When the sedative…
FDA approves Xcopri (cenobamate) for the treatment of partial-onset seizures in adults

FDA approves Xcopri (cenobamate) for the treatment of partial-onset seizures in adults

SK Biopharmaceuticals, Co., Ltd., an innovative global pharmaceutical company focused on developing and bringing treatments to market for central nervous…

Copyright © All right reserved.

Editor : M. Shamsur Rahman

Published by the Editor on behalf of Independent Publications Limited at Media Printers, 446/H, Tejgaon I/A, Dhaka-1215.
Editorial, News & Commercial Offices : Beximco Media Complex, 149-150 Tejgaon I/A, Dhaka-1208, Bangladesh. GPO Box No. 934, Dhaka-1000.

Editor : M. Shamsur Rahman
Published by the Editor on behalf of Independent Publications Limited at Media Printers, 446/H, Tejgaon I/A, Dhaka-1215.
Editorial, News & Commercial Offices : Beximco Media Complex, 149-150 Tejgaon I/A, Dhaka-1208, Bangladesh. GPO Box No. 934, Dhaka-1000.

Disclaimer & Privacy Policy
....................................................
About Us
....................................................
Contact Us
....................................................
Advertisement
....................................................
Subscription

Powered by : Frog Hosting