Sunday 15 September 2019 ,
Sunday 15 September 2019 ,
Latest News
  • Beximco Group chairman issues statement to TIB to protest statement implicating Beximco
  • Be friends of people: PM to police
  • Hong Kong returns to violence with tear gas and Molotovs
  • Ready to work as OC, says DMP chief
  • RMG workers demonstrate at Mirpur seeking dues
15 July, 2019 00:00 00 AM / LAST MODIFIED: 15 July, 2019 01:14:27 AM

Finger-prick blood test could help reduce antibiotic use for some patients

MedicalXpress
Finger-prick blood test could help reduce antibiotic use for some patients
Finger-prick blood test could help reduce antibiotic use for some patients. Credit: Shutterstock

A simple finger-prick blood test could help prevent unnecessary prescribing of antibiotics for people with the lung condition chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), according to a new study by researchers from Cardiff University, University of Oxford and King's College London.

With funding from the National Institute for Health Research, the team demonstrated that using a CRP finger-prick blood test resulted in 20% fewer people using antibiotics for COPD flare-ups.

Importantly, this reduction in antibiotic use did not have a negative effect on patients' recovery over the first two weeks after their consultation at their GP surgery, or on their well-being or use of health care services over the following six months.

Safely reducing the use of antibiotics in this way may help in the battle against antibiotic resistance.

More than a million people in the UK have COPD, which is a lung condition associated with smoking and other environmental pollutants.

People living with the condition often experience exacerbations, or flare-ups, and when this happens, three out of four are prescribed antibiotics. However, two -thirds of these flare-ups are not caused by bacterial infections and antibiotics often do not benefit patients.

Professor Nick Francis, from Cardiff University's School of Medicine, said: "Governments, commissioners, clinicians, and patients living with COPD around the world are urgently seeking tools to help them know when it is safe to withhold antibiotics and focus on treating flare-ups with other treatments.

"This is a patient population that are often considered to be at high risk from not receiving antibiotics, but we were able to achieve a reduction in antibiotic use that is about twice the magnitude of that achieved by most other antimicrobial stewardship interventions, and demonstrate that this approach was safe."

The finger-prick test measures the amount of C- reactive protein (CRP) - a marker of inflammation that rises rapidly in the blood in response to serious infections. People with a COPD flare-up who have a low CRP level in the blood appear to receive little benefit from antibiotic treatment.

Professor Chris Butler, from the University of Oxford, said: "This rigorous clinical trial speaks directly to the pressing issues of; preserving the usefulness of our existing antibiotics; the potential of stratified, personalised care; the importance of contextually-appropriate evidence about point of care testing in reducing unnecessary antibiotic use, and; enhancing the quality of care for people with the common condition of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease.

"Most antibiotics are prescribed in primary medical care, and many of these prescriptions do not benefit patients: point of care testing is being vigorously promoted as a critical solution for better targeted antibiotic prescribing. However, there have been virtually no trials of point of care tests that measure impact on clinician behaviour, patient behaviour and patient outcomes.

Acute exacerbations of chronic pulmonary disease account for considerable proportion of unnecessary antibiotic use, but a good solution to the problem in ambulatory care (where most of the antibiotics are prescribed) has not been identified until now. Ours is the first trial of biomarker guided management of AECOPD in ambulatory care, and has found an effect that should be practice-changing."

Jonathan Bidmead and Margaret Barnard were the patient and public representatives on the PACE study, providing a voice for patients with COPD: Jonathan Bidmead commented: "We need to highlight not only how many people are saved by antibiotics but also that many are harmed though unnecessary antibiotic use. As a COPD sufferer, I know that antibiotics are routinely used at the first sign of an exacerbation: this study has shown that doctors can use a simple finger-prick test in a consultation to better identify those instances where antibiotics will probably do no good and may even do some harm.

This can help us focus on other treatments that may be more helpful for some exacerbations."

Professor Hywel Williams, Director of the NIHR's Health Technology Assessment (HTA) Programme, said: "This is a really important study which provides clear evidence that a simple biomarker blood test carried out in GP surgeries on people with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease experiencing flare-ups, has the potential to reduce unnecessary prescribing of antibiotics, without adversely affecting recovery from these flare-ups. This in turn helps tackle the wider global health hazards of antimicrobial resistance (AMR).

 

Comments

Most Viewed
Digital Edition
More story
Editor Speaks

Editor Speaks

Menopause is a normal physiological condition like pregnancy which every women experience after age of 45-50 years when she stops menstruating making…
Frequently Asked Questions about menopause

Frequently Asked Questions about menopause

What is menopause? Menopause is a normal condition that all women experience as they age. The term "menopause" can describe any of the changes…
Living with menopause

Living with menopause

Most women alive today will spend more than a third of their lives in their postmenopausal years. Menopause is often associated with uncomfortable symptoms…
Perimenopausal bleeding: Changes before the change

Perimenopausal bleeding: Changes before the change

Although some women may abruptly stop having periods leading up to the menopause, many will notice changes in patterns and irregular bleeding. Whilst…
Breast cancer in Bangladesh

Breast cancer in Bangladesh

Breast cancer in Bangladesh is increasingly being diagnosed. It is the second most common cancer in our women. Like many other cancers, our knowledge…
FAK protein linked to chemotherapy resistance in ovarian cancer

FAK protein linked to chemotherapy resistance in ovarian cancer

Although the number of women being diagnosed and dying of ovarian cancer is declining, recurrence, drug resistance and mortality remain high for women…
Breakthroughs in acne treatment

Breakthroughs in acne treatment

If over-the-counter (nonprescription) products haven't cleared up your acne, your doctor can prescribe stronger medications or other therapies. A…
Common causes of waking to urinate at night

Common causes of waking to urinate at night

BRANDON PETERS, MD If you wake during the night to pee, you may be interested in learning about the common causes of this occurrence. What is nocturia?…

Reactive attachment disorder in adults ruins relationships

MARIE MIGUEL Relationships are an integral part of our lives, and when we don’t form a healthy attachment with our parents and guardians, we can develop severe disorders as adults. Reactive attachment disorder happens when a child doesn’t form healthy bonds with their parents, and as a result,…
What older adults need to know about hydration

What older adults need to know about hydration

 K. ALEISHA FETTERS At any age, staying hydrated is important to stay healthy and feel your best. But it is increasingly crucial in the older years.…
Scientists can predict risk of heart attack with 90 per cent accuracy

Scientists can predict risk of heart attack with 90 per cent accuracy

 LAURA DONNELLY   Scientists have found a way to predict the risk of heart attack with 90 per cent accuracy - almost a decade in advance. The…
Cancer 'biggest middle-age killer in rich nations'

Cancer 'biggest middle-age killer in rich nations'

A third of Britons with high blood pressure are unaware they have the condition Cancer now causes more deaths among the middle-aged in higher-income countries…
FDA approves Rozlytrek (entrectinib) for metastatic non-small cell lung cancer and NTRK Gene fusion-positive solid tumors

FDA approves Rozlytrek (entrectinib) for metastatic non-small cell lung cancer and NTRK Gene fusion-positive solid tumors

Genentech, a member of the Roche Group, recently announced that the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) has approved Rozlytrek (entrectinib) for the…

Copyright © All right reserved.

Editor : M. Shamsur Rahman

Published by the Editor on behalf of Independent Publications Limited at Media Printers, 446/H, Tejgaon I/A, Dhaka-1215.
Editorial, News & Commercial Offices : Beximco Media Complex, 149-150 Tejgaon I/A, Dhaka-1208, Bangladesh. GPO Box No. 934, Dhaka-1000.

Editor : M. Shamsur Rahman
Published by the Editor on behalf of Independent Publications Limited at Media Printers, 446/H, Tejgaon I/A, Dhaka-1215.
Editorial, News & Commercial Offices : Beximco Media Complex, 149-150 Tejgaon I/A, Dhaka-1208, Bangladesh. GPO Box No. 934, Dhaka-1000.

Disclaimer & Privacy Policy
....................................................
About Us
....................................................
Contact Us
....................................................
Advertisement
....................................................
Subscription

Powered by : Frog Hosting