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3 June, 2019 00:00 00 AM / LAST MODIFIED: 2 June, 2019 11:26:58 PM

Brain tumour warning signs and symptoms you should know

...if you’re getting more headaches than you used to, or they’re worse than they used to be, it doesn’t mean you have a brain tumour. People get headaches for a variety of reasons, from a skipped meal or lack of sleep to concussion or stroke.
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Brain tumour warning signs and symptoms you should know

There are many types of brain tumours. Some are cancerous (malignant) and some are noncancerous (benign).

Some malignant tumours start in the brain (called primary brain cancer). Sometimes, cancer spreads from another part of the body into the brain resulting in a secondary brain tumour.

There are a lot of potential symptoms of brain tumours, but one person is unlikely to have them all. Also, symptoms vary depending on where the tumour is growing in the brain and how large it is.

Continue reading as we look at some of the most common symptoms of brain tumours, plus some symptoms that may provide a clue as to the location of the tumour.

General signs and symptoms

Symptoms of brain tumours vary depending on the type, size, and exact location in the brain. Following are some general signs and symptoms.

Headache changes

Worsening headaches are a common symptom, affecting about 50 percent of people with brain tumours.

A tumour in the brain can put pressure on sensitive nerves and blood vessels. This may result in new headaches, or a change in your old pattern of headaches, such as the following:

You have persistent pain, but it’s not like a migraine.

It hurts more when you first get up in the morning.

It’s accompanied by vomiting or new neurological symptoms.

It gets worse when you exercise, cough, or change position.

over-the-counter pain medicines don’t help at all.

Even if you’re getting more headaches than you used to, or they’re worse than they used to be, it doesn’t mean you have a brain tumour. People get headaches for a variety of reasons, from a skipped meal or lack of sleep to concussion or stroke.

Seizures

Brain tumours can push on nerve cells in the brain. This can interfere with electrical signals and result in a seizure.

A seizure is sometimes the first sign of a brain tumour, but it can happen at any stage. About 50 percent of people with brain tumours experience at least one seizure.

Seizures don’t always come from a brain tumour. Other causes of seizures include neurological problems, brain diseases, and drug withdrawal.

Personality changes or mood swings

Tumours in the brain can disrupt brain function, affecting your personality and behavior. They can also cause unexplained mood swings. For example:

You were easy to get along with, but now you’re more easily irritated.

You used to be a “go-getter,” but you’ve become passive.

You’re relaxed and happy one minute and, the next, you’re starting an argument for no apparent reason.

These symptoms can be caused by a tumour in:

certain parts of the cerebrum

the frontal lobe

the temporal lobe

These changes can occur early on, but you can also get these symptoms from chemotherapy and other cancer treatments.

Personality changes and mood swings can also be due to mental disorders, substance abuse, and other disorders involving the brain.

Memory loss and confusion

Memory problems can be due to a tumour in the frontal or temporal lobe. A tumour in the frontal or parietal lobe can also affect reasoning and decision-making. For example, you may find that:

It’s hard to concentrate, and you’re easily distracted.

You’re often confused about simple matters.

You can’t multitask and have trouble planning anything.

You have short-term memory issues.

This can happen with a brain tumour at any stage. It can also be a side effect of chemotherapy, radiation, or other cancer treatments. These problems can be exacerbated by fatigue.

Mild cognitive problems can happen for a variety of reasons other than a brain tumour. They can be the result of vitamin deficiencies, medications, or emotional disorders, among other things.

Fatigue

Fatigue is more than feeling a little tired once in a while. These are some signs that you’re experiencing true fatigue:

You’re completely exhausted most or all of the time.

You feel weak overall and your limbs feel heavy.

You often find yourself falling asleep in the middle of the day.

You’ve lost your ability to focus.

You’re irritable and out of sorts

Fatigue can be due to a cancerous brain tumour. But fatigue can also be a side effect of cancer treatments. Other conditions that cause fatigue include autoimmune diseases, neurological conditions, and anemia, to name just a few.

Depression

Depression is a common symptom among people who have received a diagnosis of a brain tumour. Even caregivers and loved ones can develop depression during the treatment period. This can present as:

feelings of sadness lasting longer than what seems normal for the situation

loss of interest in things you used to enjoy

lack of energy, trouble sleeping, insomnia

thoughts of self-harm or suicide

feelings of guilt or worthlessness

Nausea and vomiting

You might have nausea and vomiting in the early stages because a tumor is causing a hormone imbalance.

During treatment for a cancerous brain tumour, nausea and vomiting could be side effects from chemotherapy or other treatments.

Of course, you can experience nausea and vomiting for a variety of other reasons, including food poisoning, influenza, or pregnancy.

Weakness and numbness

A feeling of weakness can happen just because your body is fighting the tumour. Some brain tumours cause numbness or tingling of the hands and feet.

This tends to happen on only one side of the body and could indicate a tumour in certain parts of the brain.

Weakness or numbness can be side effects of cancer treatment, too. Other conditions, such as multiple sclerosis, diabetic neuropathy, and Guillain-Barre syndrome can also cause these symptoms.

Signs and symptoms based on tumour location

Some symptoms can provide insights into where the tumour might be located within the brain.

Vision problems can be due to a tumour located in or around the:

pituitary gland

optic nerve

occipital lobe

temporal lobe

Speech, reading, and writing difficulties:

certain parts of the cerebrum

certain parts of the cerebellum

temporal lobe

parietal lobe

Hearing problems:

near cranial nerves

temporal lobe

Swallowing problems:

cerebellum

in or near cranial nerves

Trouble with movement in the hands, arms, feet, and legs, or difficulty walking:

cerebellum

frontal lobe

Balance issues may indicate a tumour near the base of the brain.

Facial numbness, weakness, or pain may also occur with a tumor in this area.

When to see a doctor

If you have some of the signs and symptoms listed above, it certainly doesn’t mean you have a brain tumour.

Because these symptoms overlap with those of so many other conditions, it’s important to get the correct diagnosis. And for many diseases, earlier diagnosis and treatment provide a better outlook.

Make an appointment to see your doctor. Determining the cause for your symptoms is the first step toward getting the treatment you need.

 

 

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Editor : M. Shamsur Rahman

Published by the Editor on behalf of Independent Publications Limited at Media Printers, 446/H, Tejgaon I/A, Dhaka-1215.
Editorial, News & Commercial Offices : Beximco Media Complex, 149-150 Tejgaon I/A, Dhaka-1208, Bangladesh. GPO Box No. 934, Dhaka-1000.

Editor : M. Shamsur Rahman
Published by the Editor on behalf of Independent Publications Limited at Media Printers, 446/H, Tejgaon I/A, Dhaka-1215.
Editorial, News & Commercial Offices : Beximco Media Complex, 149-150 Tejgaon I/A, Dhaka-1208, Bangladesh. GPO Box No. 934, Dhaka-1000.

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