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20 May, 2019 00:00 00 AM

Coping with IBS

WebMD Medical Reference
Coping with IBS

Coping with irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) presents a number of daily challenges. While there is no cure for the disorder, treatments are available.

Learn as much as you can about the syndrome. It helps to talk with your doctor. Ask him or her any questions you may have about the disorder, no matter how embarrassing it might be. The more you know about your condition and the type of IBS you have, the better you can deal with it.

Know your IBS triggers and symptoms

Keeping track of your symptoms is another helpful tool. In a symptom journal, record when and where you experienced any stomach pain, discomfort, bloating, diarrhea, or constipation. Also include what you were doing, how you were feeling, and what type of food or medications you consumed before and when symptoms appeared.

All this information may help you and your doctor determine what triggers your IBS. Then you can take reasonable steps such as dietary modification toprevent problems and take control of your life.

Talk openly about IBS

Remember, you don't have to be alone in dealing with IBS. Seek out support from trusted family and friends.

"They could be your best resource," says Jeffrey Roberts, founder of the Irritable Bowel Syndrome (IBS) Self Help and Support Group.

Roberts, who manages his own IBS, says there are times when the disorder makes him and his family late for an event because he needs to use the bathroom. Because they know about his condition, they are more understanding.

At work, talking to a trusted supervisor or co-worker may make it easier for you to deal with the disorder. Let them know that you have a valid chronic illness, and when symptoms flare up, you have no control over it, suggests Roberts. This might mean bringing in educational materials about the disorder.

At the same time, tell them that you've got a plan to deal with the syndrome (such as taking medication or going to the bathroom a few times), and that, despite it all, you'll remain a dedicated worker. If you have a problem with your union or boss, it might help to get a note from your doctor, explaining the illness and what might occur with symptoms.

Get support

There are other sources of support if you don't feel comfortable talking with people you know. There are doctors, nurse practitioners, therapists, and dietitians who specialize in IBS and can give you valuable feedback.

Prepare for situations

Coping with IBS also takes some preparation and courage. "You don't have to be afraid to go out," says Jacks. She says people may feel more comfortable if they do a little research before going to an event. "Know where the public restroom is."

For instance, if you're going to a wedding, concert, or movie, sit at the back or end of the row for easy access to the facilities. If you go to a dinner, find out what's on the menu so that you can eat beforehand should the fare be something that would be disagreeable.

Accepting embarrassing situations may also help, says Jacks. "You have to be honest and say, 'Sorry, but I have an illness.'"

She adds: If you don't tell people, they may imagine reasons for your behavior that are stranger than IBS.

And remember, it's human to have embarrassments. Situations may not be as bad as you think. You may find other people have not noticed your trips to the bathroom or that they're dealing with their own awkward issues.

"I encourage people to talk to their friends about their condition, and then they find often that (the friend) has, for example, an eczema that she's embarrassed about," says Mary-Joan Gerson, PhD, a psychoanalyst and family therapist at the Mind Body Digestive Center in New York.

Try to reduce stress

Meditation and other stress management techniques may also be valuable in dealing with uncomfortable situations.

"When you start to get that panic feeling, you can go into that other state of consciousness," says Gerson, noting that regular practice of things like meditation can help you even if you're in the middle of a meeting. "If you do meditation as a practice, you can take a couple of deep breaths and get yourself into something like that different perspective."

If you still have trouble dealing with your condition, see a therapist, advises Gerson. She and her husband, Charles Gerson, MD, a gastroenterologist, worked with 41 patients who received both psychotherapy and standard medical care. In two weeks, the patients reported a 50% improvement in symptoms.

Psychotherapy is part of an approach called behavioral therapy. Other types of this treatment include relaxation therapy, biofeedback, hypnotherapy, and cognitive behavioral therapy.

Indeed, there are many ways to cope with IBS. Hiding is not a good option.

Roberts says people who avoid going out because of their fear get to a point where ''they feel they can't do anything,'' he says.

"You can cope," Roberts says. "It's a matter of trying to live with your symptoms rather than having your symptoms take over your life."

 

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Editor : M. Shamsur Rahman

Published by the Editor on behalf of Independent Publications Limited at Media Printers, 446/H, Tejgaon I/A, Dhaka-1215.
Editorial, News & Commercial Offices : Beximco Media Complex, 149-150 Tejgaon I/A, Dhaka-1208, Bangladesh. GPO Box No. 934, Dhaka-1000.

Editor : M. Shamsur Rahman
Published by the Editor on behalf of Independent Publications Limited at Media Printers, 446/H, Tejgaon I/A, Dhaka-1215.
Editorial, News & Commercial Offices : Beximco Media Complex, 149-150 Tejgaon I/A, Dhaka-1208, Bangladesh. GPO Box No. 934, Dhaka-1000.

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