Monday 14 October 2019 ,
Monday 14 October 2019 ,
Latest News
  • Mia Seppo summoned over Abrar murder statement
  • Writ seeks ban on student politics at universities
  • Want to get Bangladesh ready to face any calamity: PM
  • 8 ABT men indicted in Dipan murder case
  • ‘Please free my son, forgive his mistakes’: Samrat’s mother to PM
  • Abrar killers won’t be spared: Law minister
20 August, 2019 00:00 00 AM
Print

For heart patients, CPAP treatment may ease depression: Study

HealthDay
For heart patients, CPAP treatment may ease depression: Study

Continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) treatment of obstructive sleep apnea can ease depression in people with heart disease, according to a groundbreaking new study.

"Patients who have had a stroke or heart attack are prone to suffer from low mood and are two to three times more likely to develop clinical depression, which then further elevates their risk of future heart attacks and strokes," said senior author Doug McEvoy, a sleep researcher at Flinders University in Adelaide, Australia.

His team analyzed data from nearly 2,700 patients with obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) and moderate-to-severe heart disease who were enrolled in the Sleep Apnea Cardiovascular Endpoints (SAVE) trial.

"After following them for an average of 3.7 years, we found that CPAP provided significant reductions in depression symptoms compared with those who were not treated for OSA. The improvement for depression was apparent within six months and was sustained," study first author Danni Zheng said in a Flinders news release. She is a postdoctoral research fellow at the George Institute for Global Health in Sydney, Australia.

Patients who had lower mood scores to begin with appeared to get the greatest mood-related benefit from CPAP use, the authors said.

Their study -- described as the largest of its kind and one of only a few to examine how CPAP affects mood in heart patients -- was recently published in the journal EClinicalMedicine.

The patients studied were enrolled in the SAVE trial based solely on their history of heart disease, not their mood, Zheng noted.

Up to 50% of heart disease patients have sleep apnea, so it's "welcome news that treatment of OSA substantially relieves cardiovascular patients' depressive symptoms and improves their well-being," McEvoy said.

The findings could lead to use of CPAP to combat depression, even in people who don't have sleep apnea, according to the researchers.

New research is untangling the complex relationship between symptoms of depression and losses in memory and thinking that often emerge together with Alzheimer's disease.

In fact, the new data suggests that "depression symptoms themselves may be among the early changes in the preclinical stages of dementia syndromes," explained study lead author Dr. Jennifer Gatchel. She works in the division of geriatric psychiatry at Massachusetts General Hospital in Boston.

In the study, researchers examined brain scans and other data gathered over seven years from 276 older adults enrolled in the Harvard Aging Brain Study. All of the participants were still living independently in the community at the beginning of the study and were considered healthy.

However, the analysis revealed a significant link between worsening depression symptoms and mental decline over two to seven years, and both of these trends seemed to be linked to a buildup of amyloid protein in brain tissue.

The slow accumulation of amyloid has long been known as a hallmark of Alzheimer's disease.

"Our research found that even modest levels of brain amyloid deposition can impact the relationship between depression symptoms and cognitive [thinking] abilities," Gatchel said in a hospital news release.

The new insight that depression symptoms might be part of the Alzheimer's process could further research into the prevention or treatment of the illness, she added.

 

Comments

More Op-ed stories
Brig. General Jamil—an epitome of courage In the dawn of August 15, 1975, Bangabandhu Sheikh Mujibur Rahman made one of his final phone calls to his military secretary Col Jamil Uddin Ahmad. He had been attacked, Bangabandhu told Col Jamil, and…

Copyright © All right reserved.

Editor : M. Shamsur Rahman

Published by the Editor on behalf of Independent Publications Limited at Media Printers, 446/H, Tejgaon I/A, Dhaka-1215.
Editorial, News & Commercial Offices : Beximco Media Complex, 149-150 Tejgaon I/A, Dhaka-1208, Bangladesh. GPO Box No. 934, Dhaka-1000.

Editor : M. Shamsur Rahman
Published by the Editor on behalf of Independent Publications Limited at Media Printers, 446/H, Tejgaon I/A, Dhaka-1215.
Editorial, News & Commercial Offices : Beximco Media Complex, 149-150 Tejgaon I/A, Dhaka-1208, Bangladesh. GPO Box No. 934, Dhaka-1000.

Disclaimer & Privacy Policy
....................................................
About Us
....................................................
Contact Us
....................................................
Advertisement
....................................................
Subscription

Powered by : Frog Hosting