Monday 13 July 2020 ,
Monday 13 July 2020 ,
Breaking News
  • Bangladesh reports 3,099 new Covid-19 cases, 39 deaths
  • Bangladesh reports 3,099 new Covid-19 cases, 39 deaths
18 April, 2019 00:00 00 AM
Print

Common sleep myths endanger public health

Common sleep myths endanger public health

Mistaken beliefs about sleep are common and pose a significant health threat, a new study warns.

Among these myths: some people only need five hours of sleep; snoring is harmless; a drink before bedtime helps you fall asleep.

"Sleep is a vital part of life that affects our productivity, mood, and general health and well-being," said lead investigator Rebecca Robbins. "Dispelling myths about sleep promotes healthier sleep habits which, in turn, promote overall better health."

Robbins is a postdoctoral research fellow in the department of population health at NYU Langone Health in New York City.

For the study, the researchers reviewed more than 8,000 websites to identify the 20 most common beliefs about sleep. One of the top myths was the claim of some people who insist they can get by on five hours of sleep a night. The study authors said this poses the most serious health risk due the effects of long-term lack of sleep. Robbins and her colleagues suggested creating a consistent sleep schedule and getting at least seven hours of shut-eye a night.

And don't assume your snoring is no big deal -- that's another myth, the study team said. While it can be harmless, snoring can be a sign of sleep apnea, a condition in which breathing stops and starts repeatedly during the night. Left untreated, it can lead to heart problems and other illnesses. The researchers also dispelled the notion that a drink before bed can help you sleep. Alcohol actually makes it harder to achieve deep sleep, which is crucial for proper daytime functioning, they explained in a news release from NYU Langone.

The study was published online April 16 in the journal Sleep Health. Study senior investigator Girardin Jean-Louis, a professor in the departments of population health and psychiatry at NYU Langone, said the public needs to be better informed about the importance of sleep.  "For example, by discussing sleep habits with their patients, doctors can help prevent sleep myths from increasing risks for heart disease, obesity and diabetes," he said in the news release.

During normal sleep, you cycle through REM and four stages of non-REM (NREM) sleep numerous times a night. Stage 1 of NREM sleep is the lightest, while stage 4 is the deepest.

When you're repeatedly interrupted and can't cycle normally through these types and stages of sleep, you may feel tired, fatigued, and have trouble concentrating and paying attention while you're awake. Sleepiness puts you at greater risk for car wrecks and other accidents. Typically, people sleep at night -- thanks not only to the conventions of the 9-to-5 workday, but also to the close interaction between our natural sleep and alertness rhythms, which are driven by an internal "clock."

This clock is a small part of the brain called the suprachiasmatic nucleus of the hypothalamus. It sits just above the nerves leaving the back of our eyes. Light and exercise "reset" the clock and can move it forward or backward. Abnormalities related to this clock are called circadian rhythm disorders ("circa" means "about," and "dies" means "day"). Circadian rhythm disorders include jet lag, adjustments to shift work, delayed sleep phase syndrome (you fall asleep and wake up too late), and advanced sleep phase syndrome (you fall asleep and wake up too early).

                                                                                HealthDay

 

Comments

More Op-ed stories
Rural-urban migration needs information support for female migrants Approximately 34 percent of Bangladesh’s current population lives in urban areas. Of this urban population, more than half lives in the four largest cities: Dhaka, Chattogram, Khulna and Rajshahi.…

Copyright © All right reserved.

Editor : M. Shamsur Rahman

Published by the Editor on behalf of Independent Publications Limited at Media Printers, 446/H, Tejgaon I/A, Dhaka-1215.
Editorial, News & Commercial Offices : Beximco Media Complex, 149-150 Tejgaon I/A, Dhaka-1208, Bangladesh. GPO Box No. 934, Dhaka-1000.

Editor : M. Shamsur Rahman
Published by the Editor on behalf of Independent Publications Limited at Media Printers, 446/H, Tejgaon I/A, Dhaka-1215.
Editorial, News & Commercial Offices : Beximco Media Complex, 149-150 Tejgaon I/A, Dhaka-1208, Bangladesh. GPO Box No. 934, Dhaka-1000.

Disclaimer & Privacy Policy
....................................................
About Us
....................................................
Contact Us
....................................................
Advertisement
....................................................
Subscription

Powered by : Frog Hosting