Sunday 5 July 2020 ,
Sunday 5 July 2020 ,
Latest News
  • Coronavirus: 29 more die, 3,288 new cases detected in 24hrs
  • Coronavirus: 29 more die, 3,288 new cases detected in 24hrs
  • Coronavirus: Capital's Wari put under 21-day lockdown
  • Railways development comes into focus in new fiscal
  • Bangladesh gearing up for new era of taxation
  • Bangladesh now 8th in global weekly increase of Covid-19 cases: WHO
  • Covid-19 death toll nears 2,000 in Bangladesh
  • Covid-19 Bangladesh: Total cases raise to 1,56,391 as death toll now 1,968
  • Global coronavirus fatalities surge to 524,614
  • Coronavirus Hotline Numbers: 01944333222, 16263, 333; website: www.corona.gov.bd
17 April, 2019 00:00 00 AM
Print

A second Brexit referendum is the best way out of this crisis

Damien McElroy
A second Brexit referendum is the 
best way out of this crisis
British Prime Minister Theresa May after securing a six-month extension on Britain's exit from the EU

If there is one lesson to draw from the ongoing saga of Brexit, it is that there is no feasible compromise that will placate both sides. A full-scale political crisis has escalated as a result of the all-or-nothing atmosphere surrounding the British exit from the EU. It is futile to believe any longer that there is a middle way. Leave campaigners frustrated all efforts to adopt the quite advantageous deal that the British and Europeans struck late last year. The Remain camp have, in retaliation, stopped the pull-out in its tracks.

Until the events of the last few days, I despaired of the idea of a second referendum but I now think it is the best way out of the crisis. The extension of the timetable to October 31 means it is only logical to offer a choice between leaving on the new terms or staying in.

All parties to the process have lost control: the government, which had promised to deliver a managed exit but tanked; and parliament, which put its foot down to stop a hard exit but failed to come up with an agreed alternative. Now Europe has released its previously sure grip as well.

Last week the French president led a drive to set a deadline for the brinkmanship to come to an end, one way or another. The build-up to the summit saw Emmanuel Macron portrayed as a modern-day equivalent of General Charles de Gaulle, the post-war French president, who in the 1960s said “non” to British efforts to join the Common Market. The De Gaulle reasoning was that Britain was economically incompatible with existing members because of its post-empire international interests and was too close to the US. He warned that Britain would have to undergo a profound transformation to synchronise with its neighbours.

It would be easy to interpret De Gaulle’s words as the correct analysis in light of the Brexit referendum of 2016. The problem is that economically – not politically – Britain was profoundly transformed as it aligned its best interests with Europe. It is also clear London’s security interests are equally bound by geography to its near neighbour.

For both these reasons, Theresa May, the British prime minister, made the fateful choice earlier this month not to take Britain over a cliff edge.

Mr Macron saw an opening for De Gaulle’s badge of European integration to push back against the subsequent British application for an extension. The showdown demonstrated his Gaullist instincts are his strongest political calling card. Fearful of the rise of rightists and nationalists, Mr Macron sees Brexit as a sideshow from the real battles ahead. The longer it goes on, he seems to think, the more anti-European politics will thrive and disrupt. Far better to focus on deepening the union between core European states, which means pushing out Westminster and sidelining doubters like Poland and Hungary.

    Bloomberg

 

Comments

More Editorial stories
Entente cordiale 
with Bhutan The visit of Bhutanese Prime Minister, Dr. Lotay Tshering, generated a special interest in Bangladesh for several reasons. Firstly, Bhutan was the first country to recognise Bangladesh on 6 December,…

Copyright © All right reserved.

Editor : M. Shamsur Rahman

Published by the Editor on behalf of Independent Publications Limited at Media Printers, 446/H, Tejgaon I/A, Dhaka-1215.
Editorial, News & Commercial Offices : Beximco Media Complex, 149-150 Tejgaon I/A, Dhaka-1208, Bangladesh. GPO Box No. 934, Dhaka-1000.

Editor : M. Shamsur Rahman
Published by the Editor on behalf of Independent Publications Limited at Media Printers, 446/H, Tejgaon I/A, Dhaka-1215.
Editorial, News & Commercial Offices : Beximco Media Complex, 149-150 Tejgaon I/A, Dhaka-1208, Bangladesh. GPO Box No. 934, Dhaka-1000.

Disclaimer & Privacy Policy
....................................................
About Us
....................................................
Contact Us
....................................................
Advertisement
....................................................
Subscription

Powered by : Frog Hosting