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23 January, 2019 00:00 00 AM
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America’s new policy in Africa is an attempt to contain Chinese and Russian influence

Ismail Einashe
America’s new policy in Africa is an attempt to contain Chinese and Russian influence

Last Tuesday, 21 people were killed and many more injured in an armed attack on the upscale Dusit hotel in the Kenyan capital of Nairobi. Responsibility was claimed by the Al Qaeda-affiliated group Al Shabab. In addition to the immediate carnage it caused, this atrocity highlights the risk posed by such militant factions to wider African security.

It is easy to think that this growing threat is why the Trump administration has ramped up its level of engagement in the Horn of Africa, where the Somalian terror organisation is based. In December, the US unexpectedly instituted a new set of policies for the whole continent, approved by president Donald Trump and announced by his national security adviser John Bolton. Speaking at the Heritage Foundation, a conservative think tank in Washington DC, Mr Bolton said that America’s priorities included enhancing economic ties with African nations and combating extremist groups.

However, this new approach has far less to do with developing mutually beneficial economic and security links than curtailing the ambitions of China and Russia in a rapidly developing and resource-rich territory. This much was clear when Mr Bolton accused both China and Russia of "deliberately and aggressively targeting their investments in the region to gain a competitive advantage over the United States”.

China was singled out for particular criticism, with Mr Bolton stating that it has employed bribery, opaque agreements and “strategic use of debt” to hold African countries “captive to Beijing’s wishes and demands”. By way of example, he referred to two nations: Zambia and Djibouti.

Copper-rich Zambia has lately witnessed a wave of popular protest over its massive debts and economic ties to China. Since 2017, the strategically located east African nation of Djibouti has been home to China’s first-ever overseas military base. It is no coincidence that it also owes 80 per cent of its external debt to China. In September last year, concerned US senators accused China of engaging in “economic warfare” in such countries. Regardless of the recent reconsideration of his policies, it is worth remembering that Mr Trump’s presidency has been one of the worst in the history of US-Africa relations. In January last year, he alienated large numbers of people by describing African nations as “s***hole countries”. Soon after that, he threatened to withdraw aid from states that voted against his controversial decision to move the US embassy in Israel from Tel Aviv to Jerusalem. To many observers, his recent manoeuvres look like a desperate scramble to regain waning influence in a region where much of the goodwill traditionally extended to the US has evaporated. More importantly, for many, increased US engagement carries chilling Cold War resonances. During that era, various African states took clear sides in the ideological battle between eastern communism and western capitalism. Wedged between competing superpowers, ordinary people all too often paid a heavy price, from the Congo crisis (1960 to 1965), to the first civil war in Chad (1965 to 1979) and the Mozambican civil war (1977 to 1992).

The writer is a journalist based in London

 

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Editor : M. Shamsur Rahman
Published by the Editor on behalf of Independent Publications Limited at Media Printers, 446/H, Tejgaon I/A, Dhaka-1215.
Editorial, News & Commercial Offices : Beximco Media Complex, 149-150 Tejgaon I/A, Dhaka-1208, Bangladesh. GPO Box No. 934, Dhaka-1000.

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