Monday 22 April 2019 ,
Monday 22 April 2019 ,
Latest News
  • 87 bomb detonators found at Colombo bus station: Police
  • Bangladesh, Brunei sign 7 instruments
  • Improvised bomb made safe near Colombo airport: Police
  • Family's near miss at bombed Sri Lanka church
  • Death toll in Sri Lanka serial blasts hits to 290
  • Sri Lanka blocks social media after Easter Sunday bombings
  • Ukraine comedian Zelensky wins presidency in landslide
  • ‘Husband’ burns wife in Laxmipur
18 December, 2018 00:00 00 AM
Print

Family, school support may help stop bullies in their tracks

Family, school support may help stop bullies 
in their tracks

Children with strong family ties and school support are more likely to try to stop bullying when they see it, new research suggests. The study included 450 sixth-graders and 446 ninth-graders who were asked about their relationships with their family, friends and teachers. The students were then presented with six scenarios of specific aggressive acts: physical aggression; cyberbullying; social exclusion/rejection by a group; intimate partner violence; social aggression, such as teasing or harmful gossip; and exclusion by a former friend.

The investigators then asked the students to rate the acceptability of intervening in these situations. "We found that family is very important," said study co-author Secil Gonultas, a doctoral student at North Carolina State University. "The stronger a student's reported 'good family management,' or positive family relationships, the more likely a student was to deem aggressive behaviors and retaliation unacceptable, and the more likely they were to intervene in either case," Gonultas said in a university news release.

And according to study lead author Kelly Lynn Mulvey, "sixth-graders were more likely than ninth-graders to find aggressive behaviors unacceptable and to intervene." Mulvey is an assistant professor of psychology at N.C. State.

"That suggests it's important to maintain anti-bullying efforts into high school -- which many places are already doing," she added.

The researchers also found that students who felt excluded or discriminated against by peers or teachers were less likely to stand up for victims of bullying.

"The study tells us that both home and school factors are important for recognizing bullying behavior as inappropriate, and taking steps to intervene," Mulvey said.

"It highlights the value of positive school environments and good teachers, and the importance of family support, when it comes to addressing bullying," she concluded.

Children's behaviour has worsened over the past five years, according to a survey of teachers which found that a fifth thought girls were more likely to cause trouble than boys.

The survey, published after teachers at a Lancashire school went on strike over discipline, found low-level disruption, including chatting and "horsing around", was the biggest problem. Boys were more likely to be physically aggressive while girls tended to ostracise other pupils.

The behaviour of boys was more of a challenge than that of girls but the actions of each sex had deteriorated, according to 56.5% of staff surveyed by the Association of Teachers and Lecturers (ATL).

Among male pupils the most challenging behaviour for teachers was physical aggression, such as pushing, spitting, kicking and hitting. A secondary teacher quoted in the survey said boys were usually aggressive with other pupils, while girls tended to call one another names.

Teachers criticised a lack of role models in the home. A primary teacher said: "The boys are far more willing to be aggressive to adults, verbally and even physically. There don't seem to be any parental boundaries set of what is an appropriate way to speak and deal with another adult."

Teachers at Darwen Vale high school, Lancashire, walked out over unruly pupil behaviour this month. They said children challenged them to fights and threatened to film lessons and post them online.

 HealthDay

 

Comments

Poll
Today's Question »
State minister for power Nasrul Hamid yesterday said everyone to have access to electricity by June. Do you think the feat achievable by the timeframe?
 Yes
 No
 No Comment
Yes 52.6%
No 43.5%
No Comment 3.9%
Most Viewed
Digital Edition
Archive
SunMonTueWedThuFri Sat
010203040506
07080910111213
14151617181920
21222324252627
282930
More Op-ed stories
Declaration of Independence by Bangabandhu: The historical facts
Four decades and seven years ago on the 16th December 1971 we achieved our glorious victory and got ourselves liberated from the domination of Pakistan, to give birth to a new Bengali Nation called Bangladesh.…

Copyright © All right reserved.

Editor : M. Shamsur Rahman

Published by the Editor on behalf of Independent Publications Limited at Media Printers, 446/H, Tejgaon I/A, Dhaka-1215.
Editorial, News & Commercial Offices : Beximco Media Complex, 149-150 Tejgaon I/A, Dhaka-1208, Bangladesh. GPO Box No. 934, Dhaka-1000.

Editor : M. Shamsur Rahman
Published by the Editor on behalf of Independent Publications Limited at Media Printers, 446/H, Tejgaon I/A, Dhaka-1215.
Editorial, News & Commercial Offices : Beximco Media Complex, 149-150 Tejgaon I/A, Dhaka-1208, Bangladesh. GPO Box No. 934, Dhaka-1000.

Disclaimer & Privacy Policy
....................................................
About Us
....................................................
Contact Us
....................................................
Advertisement
....................................................
Subscription

Powered by : Frog Hosting