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4 September, 2018 00:00 00 AM
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What every woman needs to know about ovarian cancer

What every woman needs to know about ovarian cancer

Women need to know the symptoms of ovarian cancer and see a doctor if they have them, an ob-gyn expert says. Ovarian cancer is the fifth-leading cause of death in American women, claiming more lives than any other cancer of the female reproductive system, according to the American Cancer Society.

About 22,240 women in the United States will be diagnosed with the disease in 2018, and over 14,000 will die from it, according to the U.S. National Cancer Institute. September is Ovarian Cancer Awareness Month. "Any woman who experiences unexplained bloating, an upset stomach, an urgency to urinate or abdominal pain for a few weeks, should go see a doctor, and if her doctor does not take these symptoms seriously, she should see another doctor," said Dr. Stephanie Blank. She is director of gynecologic oncology for the Mount Sinai Health System in New York City.

Other symptoms include pelvic pain, fatigue, unexplained weight change, and abnormal bleeding or any bleeding after menopause.

"Too often, women are sent to the wrong doctor, or [are] told they're just aging or gaining weight when experiencing these kinds of symptoms, and by then they have lost valuable time," Blank said in a Mount Sinai news release.

Women who are diagnosed with ovarian cancer before it has spread have a five-year survival of 93 percent, researchers have found. But detection of ovarian cancer is difficult and often delayed. Women with BRCA1 and BRCA2 gene mutations are at increased risk for ovarian cancer, and the risk for all women increases with age. Half of all ovarian cancers are diagnosed in women who are 63 and older.

Long-term use of birth control pills reduces the risk of ovarian cancer by about 50 percent, according to the news release. Removing fallopian tubes and ovaries is the best means of ovarian cancer prevention, but is not appropriate for all women.

It is the fifth most common cause of cancer deaths in women and the tenth most common cancer among women in the United States.

Among the gynecologic cancers—those affecting the uterus, cervix, and ovaries—ovarian cancer has the highest rate of deaths.

In 2017, around 22,440 women in the U.S. are expected to receive a diagnosis of ovarian cancer, and around 14,080 are expected to die from this disease.

Around 22,000 Americans receive a diagnosis of ovarian cancer yearly. Risk factors for developing ovarian cancer include family history, older age, reproductive history, and obesity. Treatment options include surgery, radiotherapy, and chemotherapy.

If it is diagnosed in the early stages, there is a 94 percent chance of surviving for at least 5 more years.

Pelvic pain can be a sign of ovarian cancer. Most ovarian cancers start in the epithelium, or outer lining, of the ovary. In the early stages, there may be few or no symptoms. Symptoms may resemble those of other conditions, such as premenstrual syndrome (PMS), irritable bowel syndrome (IBS), or a temporary bladder problem. The main difference between ovarian cancer and other possible disorders is the persistence and gradual worsening of symptoms. Early symptoms of ovarian cancer may include: pain in the pelvis, the lower abdomen, or the lower part of the body

As the cancer progresses, there may also be: nausea,  weight loss, breathlessness, tiredness and  loss of appetite

If an individual experiences bloating, pressure, or pain in the abdomen or pelvis that lasts for more than a few weeks they should see a doctor immediately.

HealthDay

 

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Editor : M. Shamsur Rahman

Published by the Editor on behalf of Independent Publications Limited at Media Printers, 446/H, Tejgaon I/A, Dhaka-1215.
Editorial, News & Commercial Offices : Beximco Media Complex, 149-150 Tejgaon I/A, Dhaka-1208, Bangladesh. GPO Box No. 934, Dhaka-1000.

Editor : M. Shamsur Rahman
Published by the Editor on behalf of Independent Publications Limited at Media Printers, 446/H, Tejgaon I/A, Dhaka-1215.
Editorial, News & Commercial Offices : Beximco Media Complex, 149-150 Tejgaon I/A, Dhaka-1208, Bangladesh. GPO Box No. 934, Dhaka-1000.

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