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13 March, 2018 00:00 00 AM
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Trump defers on arming teachers

AP

US President Donald Trump yesterday said that he is "watching court cases and rulings" before taking action on raising age limits for purchasing some firearms, arguing that there is "not much political support (to put it mildly)," reports AP. Trump's tweet came after his White House put out a plan to combat school shootings that doesn't increase the minimum age for purchasing assault weapons to 21 — an idea Trump publicly favored just last month — and leaves the question of arming teachers to states and local communities.
Instead, a new federal commission on school safety will examine the age issue as part of a package the White House announced Sunday in response to the school shooting in Parkland, Florida, last month that left 17 dead.
At a rally in Pennsylvania on Saturday, Trump criticized policy commissions while speaking about the opioid problem, saying, "We can't just keep setting up blue-ribbon committees."
On Twitter on Monday, Trump described the school shooting effort as a "very strong improvement" and said, "Armed guards OK, deterrent!" On age limits, he said: "watching court cases and rulings before acting. States are making this decision. Things are moving rapidly on this, but not much political support (to put it mildly)."
The president quickly drew Democratic criticism over age limits. Sen. Richard Blumenthal, D-Conn., tweeted that Trump "couldn't even summon the political courage to propose raising the age limit on firearm purchases - despite repeated promises to support such a step at a meeting with lawmakers." For now, the White House is backing a modest background check bill and a school safety measure, which both are expected to have widespread bipartisan support— even though some Republicans object and many Democrats say they are insufficient.
Republican Sen. Orrin Hatch of Utah, who wrote the school safety bill, tweeted he was "grateful" for the White House backing, calling the measure "the best first step we can take" to make students safer.

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Editor : M. Shamsur Rahman

Published by the Editor on behalf of Independent Publications Limited at Media Printers, 446/H, Tejgaon I/A, Dhaka-1215.
Editorial, News & Commercial Offices : Beximco Media Complex, 149-150 Tejgaon I/A, Dhaka-1208, Bangladesh. GPO Box No. 934, Dhaka-1000.

Editor : M. Shamsur Rahman
Published by the Editor on behalf of Independent Publications Limited at Media Printers, 446/H, Tejgaon I/A, Dhaka-1215.
Editorial, News & Commercial Offices : Beximco Media Complex, 149-150 Tejgaon I/A, Dhaka-1208, Bangladesh. GPO Box No. 934, Dhaka-1000.

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